Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation

Library | SearchERIC | Test Locator | ERIC System | Resources | Calls for papers | About us

 

 

QUESTION/PROBLEM: International Comparative Education

last updated January 8, 1998





Example queries:

How do U.S. students compare to their peers abroad in terms of educational achievement?

How do I ascertain the structure of foreign educational systems?

Does ERIC offer any information about the status of other countries' national assessments?

How is the U.S. National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) used for international comparisons?


Table of Contents


COMMENTARY

The results from the 1996 Third International Mathematics and Science Study show average mathematics and science achievement levels for our 4th and 8th graders to be near or above international averages. In the 1992 International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement reading assessment, our nine-year-olds placed second in the world and our fourteen-year-olds placed ninth in the world.

Interpretations of results of international educational comparisons should go beyond simple rankings. For example, the United States is below average in 8th grade mathematics, largely because of terrible scores on the algebra portion of the mathematics test. However, those scores make sense when one considers that we do not teach algebra in the eighth grade; we typically teach algebra in high school (Only 19 percent of our eighth grade students report taking algebra as a subject.). In comparison to other countries, American eighth graders are exposed to more topics within mathematics; therefore, maybe we should reexamine our scope and sequence. But, this is not evidence of school failure. This is not evidence that out future competitiveness is in jeopardy.

Commentary by Larry Rudner, Director, ERIC Clearinghouse on Assessment & Evaluation

[Table of Contents]


INTERNET RESOURCES

Education Indicators: An International Perspective
This browsable, searchable compendium of the National Center for Education Statistics offers "...a wide range of indicators from a variety of sources contrasting education in the United States with other G-7 countries."

International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement - IEA
A verbatim statement of IEA's mission are taken from its page: "...[to undertake] the conduct of comparative studies focusing on educational policies and practices in order to enhance learning within and across systems of education."

Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)
The TIMSS homepage offers full explanatory information for this study of half-a-million students in 41 countries.

U.S. Network for Education Information (USNEI)
An excellent source for discerning the structure and organization of education systems worldwide. [from the introduction:] USNEI presents basic information about education in the United States that is of interest to people outside our country, especially students, counselors, government officials, and the general public...USNEI (also) provides extensive links to authoritative sources of information about foreign education systems and information to help American students, parents, and educators who are contemplating an educational experience abroad.

[Table of Contents]


MAJOR BIBLIOGRAPHIC RESOURCES
[Check your local library or bookstore for access]


The most complete and current descriptions of various countries' 
educational systems of which we are aware are contained in:


1.
International encyclopedia of national systems of education / 
International encyclopedia of education (2nd ed.)       
     edited by T. Neville Postlethwaite.      
     Tarrytown, N.Y., USA : Pergamon, 1995. 
     Series:  Resources in education 


2.
Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators.
      Paris : Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development ; 
     [Washington, D.C. : OECD Publications and Information Centre, 
     distributor], 1996.

See the section entitled Annotated Organisation Charts of Education Systems, 
pp.250-337.


The following works provide general overviews of countries' educational 
systems:


3.
The statesman's year-book world gazetteer 
     John Paxton.
     New York : St. Martin's Press, 1991. 

The arrangement will appear as
  Country/Social Institutions/Education


4.
The Europa world year book. 
     London, England : Europa Publications Limited, c1989- 
     Annual
     30th ed. (1989)-
     Issued in two vols.

The arrangement will appear as
  Country/Introductory Survey/Education (for Developed Nations only)

[Table of Contents]


ERIC DOCUMENTS CITATIONS

ERIC Documents Citations for International Comparative Education [general]
 
 ED398287  TM026032
  Education in States and Nations: Indicators Comparing U.S. States 
with Other Industrialized Countries in 1991. Second Edition.
  Phelps, Richard P.; And Others
  Jul 1996
  372p.; For the first edition (1988 Indicators), see ED 366 615.
  ISBN: 0-16-048685-8
  Available From: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of 
Documents, Mail Stop: SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-9328.
  Document Type: BOOK (010);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110);  EVALUATIVE 
REPORT (142)
  Indicators in this volume provide international benchmarks for 
assessing the condition of education in U.S. states and in the United 
States as a whole by comparison with many other industrialized 
countries for which data are available.  On six sets of indicators 
(37 indicators in all), country-level and state-level measures are 
arrayed side-by-side to facilitate comparison.  The indicators are 
grouped into six categories: (1) background; (2) participation; (3) 
processes and institutions; (4) achievement and attainment; (5) labor 
market outcomes; and (6) finance.  The presentation of each indicator 
includes an explanation of what it measures, why it is important, and 
key results from a comparison of countries and states.  Throughout 
the report, comparisons are most often made in the text among like-
sized entities.  The presentation of each indicator also includes 
separate tables for states and countries and graphs that display 
states and countries together.  Supplemental notes and a statistical 
appendix include supplemental and technical information on how 
measures in the indicators were calculated, and a glossary is 
included.  (Contains 37 two-part tables and 37 figures, some of which 
have several parts.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Cross 
Cultural Studies; Educational Assessment; *Educational Attainment; 
Educational Finance; Educational Policy; Educational Practices; 
*Elementary Secondary Education; Enrollment; Foreign Countries; 
Institutional Characteristics; *International Education; 
International Studies; Labor Market; *Outcomes of Education
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators


  ED400345  TM026356
  Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators.
  1996
  396p.; Document also available in French. For a related document, 
see TM 026 357; for the third (previous) edition, see ED 383 730.
  Document Type: BOOK (010);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110);  EVALUATIVE 
REPORT (142)
  This fourth edition of "Education at a Glance" presents a set of 43 
educational indicators covering the 1993-94 school year in the member 
countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and 
Development (OECD).  These indicators provide regularly updated 
information on the organization and operation of education systems.  
Following the introductory section are seven chapters entitled: (1) 
"Demographic, Social and Economic Context of Education"; (2) "Costs 
of Education and Human and Financial Resources"; (3) "Access to 
Education, Participation and Progression"; (4) "School Environment 
and School/Classroom Processes"; (5) "Graduate Output of Educational 
Institutions"; (6) "Student Achievement and Literacy"; (7) "Labour 
Market Outcomes of Education".  Five annexes provide a glossary and 
supplemental information about report preparation and participants.  
(Contains, apart from the organizational charts of OECD member 
countries' education systems, 84 tables and 64 charts.) (LMD)
  Descriptors: *Economic Factors; Educational Environment; 
Educational Finance; Educational Research; *Elementary Secondary 
Education; Evaluation Methods; Expectation; *Expenditures; Foreign 
Countries; *Outcomes of Education; *Resource Allocation; Social 
Influences; Student Characteristics
  Identifiers: *International Educational Indicators; *Organisation 
for Economic Cooperation Development


  ED400346  TM026357
  Education at a Glance: Analysis.
  1996
  76p.; Document also available in French. For a related document, 
see TM 026 356.
  ISBN: 92-64-15357-8
  Document Type: BOOK (010);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110);  EVALUATIVE  REPORT
(142)
  This new annual publication, a companion volume to the fourth 
edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators," presents a 
series of concise analyses on themes relevant to educational policy, 
based upon selected international education indicators.  The analyses  are
presented in the following four chapters: (1) "An Overview of 
Enrolment (sic) and Expenditure Trends"; (2) "Educational Outcomes: 
Measuring Student Achievement and Adult Competence"; (3) "Transition 
from School to Work"; (4) "Teachers' Pay and Conditions".  One annex 
offers "Data for the Figures" in 22 tables.  (Author/LMD)
  Descriptors: *Economic Factors; Educational Environment; 
Educational Finance; *Educational Policy; Educational Research; 
*Elementary Secondary Education; Expectation; Expenditures; Foreign 
Countries; *Outcomes of Education; *Resource Allocation; Social 
Influences; Student Characteristics; Tables (Data)
  Identifiers: *International Educational Indicators


  ED403331  TM026391
  Education Indicators: An International Perspective.
  Matheson, Nancy; And Others
  Nov 1996
  321p.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110)
  This publication compiles a comprehensive set of educational 
indicators using data from a variety of sources and presents results 
of interest to a U.S. audience about education in the United States 
and other countries.  International indicators provide the United 
States with an opportunity to compare its performance with that of 
other countries, to identify areas for improvement, and to suggest 
new approaches to producing a world-class class educational system.  
The report presents data on many countries, but the primary 
comparisons are among the Group of Seven (G-7) countries, seven 
industrialized nations with large economies: Canada, France, Germany, 
Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.  The 
achievement indicators show that the performance of U.S. students is 
mixed.  They perform well in reading in comparison with their peers 
in other countries, and less well in geography and science.  Their 
weakest area relative to students in other countries is mathematics.  
The finance indicators presented in this publication show that public 
financial investment in education in the United States is among the 
highest of the G-7 countries on multiple measures.  Indicators are 
divided into: (1) Participation and Student Flows; (2) Achievement 
and Attainment; (3) Education and Labor Market Destinations; (4) 
Contextual Factors; and (5) Societal Support for Education.  
(Contains 45 tables, 45 figures, and 15 references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; Context 
Effect; Cross Cultural Studies; *Developed Nations; *Educational 
Finance; Education Work Relationship; *Elementary Secondary Education; 
Financial Support; Foreign Countries; Geography; Higher Education; 
International Education; International Studies; Mathematics; 
*Performance Factors; Reading; Sciences; Student Characteristics
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators; *International Educational 
Indicators


  EJ520981  TM519367
  What Do International Assessments Imply for World-Class Standards?
  Linn, Robert L.; Baker, Eva L.
  Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, v17 n4 p405-18 Win 
  1995
  Paper prepared for the U.S. Board on International Comparative 
Studies in Education. Financial support provided by the Spencer 
Foundation.
  ISSN: 0162-3737
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  The implications of international assessments in setting world-
class performance standards are explored.  Possible uses of recent 
international assessments as benchmarks against which to compare the 
achievement of U.S. students are illustrated.  Characteristics of 
international assessments that affect their usefulness as benchmarks 
are discussed.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; *Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Assessment; Educational Improvement; 
Foreign Countries; International Education; International Studies; 
*Standards; Test Use
  Identifiers: *Benchmarking; Standard Setting; United States; *World 
Class Standards

  ED383761  TM023297
  International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of 
Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies.
  1995
  129p.
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Since its inception in 1988, the Board on International Comparative 
Studies in Education (BICSE) has monitored U.S. participation in 
those cross national comparative studies in education that are funded 
by its sponsors, the National Science Foundation and the National 
Center for Education Statistics.  This set of international study 
descriptions represents a status report on 17 projects presented to 
BICSE at various times in 1994.  Reports were prepared by the 
projects themselves and are presented without evaluation or editing.  
The following are described: (1) "Case Studies of U.S.  Innovations 
in Mathematics, Science, and Technology in an International Context" 
(National Center for Improving Science Education and other agencies); 
(2) "Civics Education Study" (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement); (3) "Comparative Study of 
Teacher Training and Professional Development Practices in APEC (Asia 
Pacific Economic Co-operation) Members" (Asia Pacific Economic Co-
operation Ministerial); (4) "Computers in Education Study" 
(International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement  IEA ); (5) "Cross-national Studies of Adult 
Understanding of Science" (Chicago Academy of Sciences); (6) 
"Education Indicators Project (INES)" (Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development); (7) "International Adult Literacy 
Study" (Statistics Canada); (8) "International Assessment of 
Educational Progress" (Educational Testing Service); (9) 
"International Comparative Study of Mathematics and Science Tests" 
(National Center for Improving Science Education); (10) 
"International Study of Teachers' Attitudes toward Reform and Teacher 
Preparation for Implementing Reform" (George Washington University 
Institute for Curriculum Standards and Technology); (11) "Language 
Education Study" (IEA); (12) "New Standards Project (benchmark 
activities)" (Learning Research and Development Center at the 
University of Pittsburgh and National Center on Education and the 
Economy); (13) "Preprimary Project" (IEA); (14) "Reading Literacy 
Study" (IEA); (15) "Study on Performance Standards in Education" (U.S.  
Department of Education); (16) "Survey of Mathematics and Science 
Opportunity" (Michigan State University); and (17) "Third 
International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) (including 
special U.S.  TIMSS activities)" (IEA).  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Computer 
Uses in Education; Cross Cultural Studies; *Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; *International Studies; Literacy; 
Mathematics; *National Surveys; Program Descriptions; Program 
Evaluation; Reading; Sciences; *Teacher Education
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators; International Assn Evaluation 
Educ Achievement


  ED385057  EC304090
  A Perspective on Education and Assessment in Other Nations: Where 
Are Students with Disabilities? Synthesis Report 19.
  Elliott, Judy L.; And Others
  Apr 1995
  58p.
  Available From: NCEO, 350 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Rd., 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($15).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  This report reviews five major international comparative studies on 
educational practices, assessment systems, and educational outcomes 
for students with disabilities.  The five studies reviewed are: (1) 
the Reading Literacy Survey conducted by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); (2) 
the International Assessment of Educational Progress of the 
Educational Testing Service; (3) the Third International Mathematics 
and Science Study; (4) the International Education Indicators Project 
of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development; and 
(5) the Computers in Education Study to be conducted by the IEA.  The 
report notes differences in sampling procedures and the extent to 
which students with disabilities participate in the assessments.  The 
report also reviews the educational and assessment systems of 14 
countries, focusing on the participation of students with 
disabilities.  Educational assessment systems in the following 
countries are described: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, China, 
England and Wales, France, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Nigeria, 
Sweden, Tunisia, and the United States.  Each country description 
includes information on the general education system, including age 
of entry and duration of schooling, educational policies and 
procedures for students with disabilities, how decisions are made 
about placements, assessment practices, and the reporting of 
assessment results.  (Contains 86 references.) (DB)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
Decision Making; *Disabilities; *Educational Assessment; Educational 
Practices; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
International Studies; *Outcomes of Education; Sampling; Special 
Education; *Student Evaluation; Student Participation; Student 
Placement
  Identifiers: Computers in Education (IEA); International Assessment 
of Educational Progress; International Educational Indicators; 
*International Surveys; Reading Literacy Survey; Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


  ED377252  TM022566
  Mapping the World of Education: The Comparative Database System 
(CDS). Volume One: Overview, Description, and Coding Structure.
  Hunt, E. Stephen
  Sep 1994
  179p.
  ISBN: 0-16-045241-4
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  The Comparative Database System (CDS) provides a means for coding 
and using data on U.S. and international postsecondary educational 
activity and behavior. CDS permits education data users to obtain
accurate and reliable comparative data on postsecondary education 
questions.  This document contains a discussion of the development of 
CDS, a detailed technical description of CDS and its relation to 
other databases, and advice about its use.  CDS was developed as a 
systematic means for reporting and analyzing data provided by 
respondents to the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), but it can be 
used whenever comparative and international institutional or 
individual data need to be organized and analyzed.  Section 1 is the 
overview and description background and development; concepts, 
definitions, and methodology; and implementation), while Section 2 
(half the document) contains the data codes used in CDS (geographical 
regions, countries, country subdivisions, primary language of 
instructor, standard program types, institutional types, and standard 
program completion awards and institutional levels (Contains 245 
references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Coding; Comparative Analysis; Comparative Education; 
*Data Analysis; Database Design; *Databases; Data Collection; 
Doctoral Degrees; Documentation; Elementary Secondary Education; 
Needs (Information)
  Identifiers: *Comparative Database System; *International Surveys; 
Mapping; Survey of Earned Doctorates


 EJ494136  UD518264
  Incomplete Explanations: The Case of U.S. Performance in the 
International Assessments of Education.
  Stedman, Lawrence C.
  Educational Researcher, v23 n7 p24-32 Oct   1994
  ISSN: 0013-189X
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Argues that international assessments that show U.S. educational 
inferiority are unwarranted, reviews the history of these 
assessments, and evaluates the major explanations of the achievement 
differences.  It also examines the theoretical and empirical 
underpinnings of curriculum-centered explanations because of their 
relevance to school reform.  (GLR)
  Descriptors: *Achievement Rating; Comparative Analysis; 
*Educational Assessment; Educational Change; Educational Theories; 
Elementary Secondary Education; *Evaluation Criteria; *Evaluation 
Methods; Foreign Countries; *Intelligence; *National Norms
  Identifiers: *United States


  EJ487342  TM517999
  Perspectives on Educational Testing: Discussion.
  Jones, Lyle V.
  Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, v13 n2 p28-30 Sum 
  1994
  ISSN: 0731-1745
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  The testing practices and tests described in the preceding articles 
are reviewed and compared.  This cross-cultural examination 
identifies some issues that are common to the United States and 
Europe: (1) the emphasis on performance tasks, (2) the accommodation 
of language minorities, and (3) concerns about gender differences.  
(SLD)
  Descriptors: *College Entrance Examinations; Comparative Analysis; 
Cross Cultural Studies; Educational Assessment; Educational Change; 
Educational Policy; *Educational Testing; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *Foreign Countries; Higher Education; International 
Studies; *Sex Differences; Test Coaching; Test Construction; *Test 
Use
  Identifiers: Israel; Language Minorities; Netherlands; *Performance 
Based Evaluation; Reform Efforts; Sweden; United Kingdom


  ED372581  EC303214
  The Performance of High Ability Students in the United States on 
National and International Tests.
  Callahan, Carolyn M.
  Jun 1994
  23p.; In: Ross, Patricia O' Connell, Ed. National Excellence: A 
Case for Developing America's Talent. An Anthology of Readings; see 
EC 303 213.
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  POSITION PAPER (120)
  This paper, commissioned for the development of the national 
report, "National Excellence: A Case for Developing America's 
Talent," presents data which suggest that America's top students do 
poorly in comparison with top students in comparable nations and that 
few strides have been made in significantly improving American 
students' performance.  Specific sections of the paper address: (1) 
data on trends in achievement of this population; (2) trends in 
performance on college entrance examinations; (3) short-term measures 
in mathematics and science and long-term trends in the pursuit of 
advanced degrees and productivity; (4) the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress (NAEP); (5) limitations of the NAEP for 
evaluating high ability students; (6) international comparisons; (7) 
studies of the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Education Achievement (IEA); (8) other studies supporting the IEA 
studies in mathematics; and (9) school-related factors which may 
influence the achievement of highly able American students.  The 
author urges that current trends must be reversed if the United 
States is to meet the National Education Goals set for the year 2000.  
An appendix provides definitions of high achievement on the NAEP 
scales in reading, mathematics, science, and history.  Contains 35 
references.  (DB)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; College Entrance Examinations; 
*Comparative Education; Degrees (Academic); *Educational Assessment; 
Educational Objectives; Educational Trends; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Excellence in Education; *Gifted; Higher Education; 
Mathematics; *Outcomes of Education; Sciences; *Talent; Trend 
Analysis; Underachievement
  Identifiers: *National Assessment of Educational Progress; National 
Education Goals 1990


  ED364588  TM020815
  A Guide to the International Interpretation of U.S. Education 
Program Data: CIP, IPEDS, CCD and ISCED.
  Hunt, E. Stephen
  Oct 1993
  331p.
  Document Type: CLASSROOM MATERIAL (050);  GENERAL REFERENCE (130)
  The International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) was 
developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural 
Organization in the 1960s and 1970s to be the recognized 
international standard for reporting and interpreting education 
program data.  Creating a U.S. crosswalk to this system has been a 
goal of research conducted by the Office of Educational Research and 
Improvement that awaited the revision of the Classification of 
Instructional Programs (CIP) system.  This publication contains a 
detailed discussion of the correspondence between U.S. education 
program databases and classification systems and the ISCED.  It 
includes a crosswalk between ISCED and the 1990 CIP, and crosswalks 
between the ISCED and educational level classifications used in the 
Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and the Common 
Core of Data Survey (CCD), which collects data on primary and 
secondary education.  The "Guide" also presents useful information on 
U.S. education program data.  Technological and methodological 
considerations are discussed, and crosswalking data at various 
education levels are considered.  An appendix of nearly 100 pages 
contains the master crosswalk of U.S. and ISCED codes.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Standards; *Classification; *Comparative 
Analysis; Databases; *Data Interpretation; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Higher Education; National Surveys; *Program Evaluation
  Identifiers: Classification of Instructional Programs; Common Core 
of Data Program; *Data Crosswalk Codes; Data Files; Integrated 
Postsecondary Education Data System; *International Standard 
Classification of Education; User Guides


  ED356179  SO023017
  International Education Comparisons.
  Sep 1992
  36p.
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  This publication highlights the similarities and differences found 
in education systems among many of the world's developed nations.  
The report seeks to show how different nations govern their education 
systems, how they set and implement standards, who their students 
are, how the students perform on achievement tests, and what reforms 
are being implemented.  Among the specific findings of the report are 
that while the United States has a highly decentralized education 
system, many other countries have strong national ministries of 
education that provide direction and substantial funding for schools.  
The United States is one of very few developed countries without 
extensive oversight and direction of curriculum by the federal or 
regional government.  Only the United States relies heavily on 
standardized tests.  A recent International Assessment of 
Educational Progress (IAEP 1992) showed that U.S.  13-year olds 
ranked 14th out of 15 countries in mathematics knowledge and 13th in 
science.  The United States has the highest postsecondary enrollment 
ratio in the world.  (Contains 12 references.) (DB)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Education; *Developed Nations; 
*Educational Policy; *Educational Practices; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; Higher Education; *International 
Education; International Educational Exchange


  EJ493906  SO525979
  What Does the United States Want to Learn from International 
Comparative Studies in Education?
  Griffith, Jeanne E.; Medrich, Elliott A.
  Prospects, v22 n4 p476-85   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Contends that, although surveys of international achievement have 
been of interest to the U.S. educational community, these studies are 
now receiving attention among policymakers.  Asserts that significant 
changes are occurring in world economy and that international 
achievement comparisons are receiving coverage in the U.S. media.  
(CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Adult Education; Curriculum 
Development; Educational Objectives; *Educational Research; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; Higher Education; 
International Education; *International Educational Exchange; 
Mathematics Instruction; Research Reports; *Research Utilization; 
Second Language Instruction; Teacher Education; *Theory Practice 
Relationship; Use Studies
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
National Center for Educational Statistics; *Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


  ED340781  TM018037
  Student Examination Systems in the European Community: Lessons for 
the United States.
  Madaus, George F.; Kellaghan, Thomas
  Jun 1991
  54p.; Contractor report prepared for the Office of Technology 
Assessment titled "Testing in American Schools: Asking the Right 
Questions." For related documents, see TM 018 025 and TM 018 031.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  The attractiveness of some European education policies and the 
current push toward national standards of academic achievement have 
converged recently in proposals for national educational testing in 
the United States.  This paper examines the origins and status of 
student examination policies in 12 countries of the European 
Community.  A major feature of European systems has been their 
function in selection for universities.  Although competitive 
examinations for the civil service and professions preceded 
university examinations, the latter have had more influence on the 
national examination systems, and consequently on student learning.  
In the European Community, most countries have a tradition of 
external examinations and these examinations are generally a feature 
of secondary education.  While examinations cannot be isolated from 
their national contexts, they are usually (with the exception of 
Britain) mirrors of the public school system, and external 
examinations other than the public examination system do not exist.  
The United States has an existing commercial infrastructure for 
developing and marketing standardized tests that is not found in 
Europe, where teachers and government inspectors are essential parts 
of the examination structure.  The place of any national examination 
in the United States requires considerable thought and evaluation of 
the existing infrastructure.  An 186-item list of references and 7 
tables of comparative information about examinations in the European 
Community are included.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; College Entrance Examinations; 
Comparative Analysis; *Educational Assessment; Educational Change; 
Educational Policy; Elementary Secondary Education; *Foreign 
Countries; *National Programs; Public Schools; *Student Evaluation; 
*Testing Programs; Test Use
  Identifiers: *European Community; United States


  ED377099  SO024315
  Informal Meeting of Experts on Education Indicators (Paris, France, 
January 31-February 5, 1991). Report.
  7 Mar 1991
  13p.
  Document Type: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS (021)
  Target Audience: Policymakers; Administrators; Practitioners
  The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural 
Organization (UNESCO) held a meeting of experts on education 
indicators to discuss the role of these indicators in the 1991 World 
Education Report as well as future issues concerning education 
indicators.  The meeting was opened by the chairperson with a review 
of the usefulness of indicators in providing summary measures of the 
state of education in the world and in individual nations.  The group 
discussed desirable traits of education indicators.  The need for the 
measurement of actual learning, rather than simple attendance was 
highlighted as well as the need to measure teachers' contributions 
and roles in the report.  The discussion then focused on the value of 
individual indicators and UNESCO's overall measurement strategy.  A 
general debate included the following areas: (1) coverage; (2) 
framework; (3) presentation; (4) number of indicators used; (5) 
disparities; (6) vulnerable groups; (7) illiteracy; (8) issues 
related to language and script; (9) learning outcomes and efficiency; 
(10) projections; (11) book and textbook production; (12) enrollment 
ratios; (13) teacher supply; (14) transition rates; and (15) meaning 
of public/private distinction.  Presentations followed on educational 
indicator work done by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and 
Development (OECD) and the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA).  The meeting concluded 
with a discussion on future UNESCO work on education indicators and a 
suggestion for a similar forum be held in regard to the 1993 World 
Education Report.  (CK)
  Descriptors: Comparative Education; Developing Nations; 
*Educational Development; *Educational Improvement; *Educational 
Quality; Educational Research; Educational Status Comparison; 
*Measurement; *Measurement Techniques
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators; *United Nations


  EJ435143  TM515973
  Indicators in the US and the UK.
  Fitz-Gibbon, Carol Taylor
  Evaluation and Research in Education, spec iss v4 n2 p47-49 
  1990
  Introduces five papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the 
American Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April 16-20, 
1990). For related documents, see TM 515 974-978.
  ISSN: 0950-0790
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  POSITION PAPER (120);  
EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  To explore differences and similarities in the concepts of 
educational indicators (performance indicators) in the United States 
and United Kingdom, three pairs of speakers from each country were 
invited to prepare papers and deliver their partner's paper.  
Achievement indicators, inspections/site visits, and performance 
indicators in school districts are considered.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Achievement Tests; Comparative 
Analysis; *Conference Papers; Cross Cultural Studies; Educational 
Assessment; *Educational Quality; Educational Research; Elementary 
Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; *Research Reports; School 
Districts
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators; *Performance Indicators in 
Education; Site Visits; United Kingdom; United States


  EJ419469  UD515553
  International Comparative Research in Education: Its Role in 
Educational Improvement in the U.S.
  Torney-Purta, Judith
  Educational Researcher, v19 n7 p32-35 Oct   1990
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  
EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  Describes the following organizations concerned with international 
comparative educational research: (1) the International Association 
for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); (2) the 
International Assessment of Educational Progress (IAEP); (3) the 
Board of International Comparative Studies in Education; and (4) the 
International Educational Indicators Project.  Suggests areas for new 
research.  (FMW)
  Descriptors: Achievement Rating; Comparative Analysis; *Comparative 
Education; *Comparative Testing; Educational Research; Foreign 
Countries; *International Education; *International Organizations; 
*International Programs; Program Descriptions; Research Needs
  Identifiers: *Research Suggestions; United States


  ED308102  SO019928
  Comparative Education: Statistics on Education in the United States 
and Selected Foreign Nations. CRS Report for Congress.
  Redd, Kenneth; Riddle, Wayne
  14 Nov 1988
  79p.
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  While there are severe limitations on the availability, 
comparability, and reliability of education statistics for the United 
States and other major foreign nations, a comparison of data reveals 
that the relative ranking of the United States among other nations 
with respect to educational participation in general is high, but 
that it is low in certain specific areas.  The major source of data 
for this study is the "1987 Statistical Yearbook" of the United 
Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.  Data are 
compared for three areas: participation (15 tables and charts); 
expenditures (11 tables and charts); and achievement (8 tables and 
charts).  At the gross enrollment rate, the United States is among 
the highest in the world at the secondary level, and the highest at 
the postsecondary level.  The pupil-teacher ratio for the United 
States however, is high when compared to the other nations.  The 
United States ranks relatively high in both share of gross national 
product (GNP) and of total government expenditures that are devoted 
to education, although other nations place a higher emphasis on 
spending at the primary and secondary educational levels.  
Achievement scores for the United States were relatively lower at 
higher age/grade levels in all subject areas, particularly in 
mathematics and foreign language (French).  Tests were sponsored by 
the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement.  A brief discussion and analysis section on the various 
tables and charts in each of the three data sections helps to provide 
meaningful comparisons of the data.  (PPB)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Achievement Rating; Comparative 
Analysis; *Data Interpretation; Educational Finance; Elementary 
Secondary Education; *Enrollment; Expenditure per Student; 
*Expenditures; *Federal Aid; *Foreign Countries; Government School 
Relationship; Mathematics Achievement; Postsecondary Education; 
Statistical Surveys
  Identifiers: Australia; Canada; China; France; Italy; Japan; Mexico; 
Sweden; United Kingdom; USSR; West Germany

  
  EJ485419  RC510032
  Comparative Educational Achievement Research: Can It Be Improved?
  Postlethwaite, T. Neville
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p150-58 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Discusses the utility of IEA cross-national studies of achievement 
and its determinants, why some countries appear uninterested in such 
information, the comparability of achievement data between nations, 
how to improve the selection of input and process variables, other 
international research needs, and the role of national funding 
agencies.  (SV)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; *Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Financial Support; Research and Development; *Research 
Needs; Research Utilization; Theory Practice Relationship
  Identifiers: *Comparability; International Assn Evaluation Educ 
Achievement


  EJ314327  RC505771
  National Assessment: A Review of Programs in Australia, the United 
Kingdom, and the United States.
  Power, Colin; Wood, Robert
  Comparative Education Review, v28 n3 p355-77 Aug   1984
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  POSITION PAPER (120)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  An analysis of national programs for monitoring student achievement 
in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia found that 
political considerations in all three countries have inhibited the 
clarification of program objectives and the implementation of the 
technology required to generate meaningful information capable of 
reliable analysis and interpretation.  (MM)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; 
Comparative Education; *Educational Assessment; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; *National Programs; *Outcomes of 
Education; Performance Factors; Policy Formation; *Politics of 
Education; Program Evaluation; Technological Advancement
  Identifiers: *Australia; Australian Studies in Student Performance; 
Impact; National Assessment of Educational Progress; *United Kingdom; 
United States

[Table of Contents]

ERIC Documents Citations for the International Assessment of Educational Progress

  EJ540863  EA533187
  The New Lost Generation?
  Bracey, Gerald W.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v78 n7 p578-79 Mar   1997
  ISSN: 0031-7217
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Because the Reagan and Bush administrations accentuated the 
negative about American schools, there was little mention of U.S. 
students' average performance on the geography part of the 1992 
Second International Assessment of Educational Progress.  On the 
Third International Mathematics and Science Study (1994), U.S. eighth 
graders finished slightly below average in math and slightly above 
average in science.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
Elementary Secondary Education; *Geography; *Mathematics Tests; 
*Science Tests; *Test Results
  Identifiers: *Second Int Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  EJ531717  TM519661
  The 1991 International Assessment of Educational Progress in 
Mathematics and Sciences: The Gender Differences Perspective.
  Beller, Michal; Gafni, Naomi
  Journal of Educational Psychology, v88 n2 p365-77 Jun 
  1996
  Project commissioned by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, 
and Cultural Organization from the International Association of 
Educational Assessment and conducted under the auspices of the 
National Institute for Testing and Evaluation, Israel.
  ISSN: 0022-0663
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Analysis of data from the 1991 International Assessment of 
Educational Progress for 34 countries and 3,300 students ages 9 and 
13 years in each indicates that gender differences in performance 
were generally small in mathematics, but were larger for science, 
with male scores higher in both age groups.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Age Differences; Elementary Secondary Education; 
International Studies; *Mathematics Achievement; *Sciences; *Scores; 
*Sex Differences; *Test Results
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  ED383761  TM023297
  International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of 
Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies.
  1995
  129p.
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Since its inception in 1988, the Board on International Comparative 
Studies in Education (BICSE) has monitored U.S. participation in 
those cross national comparative studies in education that are funded 
by its sponsors, the National Science Foundation and the National 
Center for Education Statistics.  This set of international study 
descriptions represents a status report on 17 projects presented to 
BICSE at various times in 1994.  Reports were prepared by the 
projects themselves and are presented without evaluation or editing.  
The following are described: (1) "Case Studies of U.S.  Innovations 
in Mathematics, Science, and Technology in an International Context" 
(National Center for Improving Science Education and other agencies); 
(2) "Civics Education Study" (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement); (3) "Comparative Study of 
Teacher Training and Professional Development Practices in APEC (Asia 
Pacific Economic Co-operation) Members" (Asia Pacific Economic Co-
operation Ministerial); (4) "Computers in Education Study" 
(International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement  IEA ); (5) "Cross-national Studies of Adult 
Understanding of Science" (Chicago Academy of Sciences); (6) 
"Education Indicators Project (INES)" (Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development); (7) "International Adult Literacy 
Study" (Statistics Canada); (8) "International Assessment of 
Educational Progress" (Educational Testing Service); (9) 
"International Comparative Study of Mathematics and Science Tests" 
(National Center for Improving Science Education); (10) 
"International Study of Teachers' Attitudes toward Reform and Teacher 
Preparation for Implementing Reform" (George Washington University 
Institute for Curriculum Standards and Technology); (11) "Language 
Education Study" (IEA); (12) "New Standards Project (benchmark 
activities)" (Learning Research and Development Center at the 
University of Pittsburgh and National Center on Education and the 
Economy); (13) "Preprimary Project" (IEA); (14) "Reading Literacy 
Study" (IEA); (15) "Study on Performance Standards in Education" (U.S.  
Department of Education); (16) "Survey of Mathematics and Science 
Opportunity" (Michigan State University); and (17) "Third 
International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) (including 
special U.S.  TIMSS activities)" (IEA).  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Computer 
Uses in Education; Cross Cultural Studies; *Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; *International Studies; Literacy; 
Mathematics; *National Surveys; Program Descriptions; Program 
Evaluation; Reading; Sciences; *Teacher Education
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators; International Assn Evaluation 
Educ Achievement


  
  EJ486983  RC510110
  Educational Inequality and Academic Achievement in England and 
France.
  Lees, Lynn Hollen
  Comparative Education Review, v38 n1 p65-87 Feb   1994
  Theme issue topic: "Schooling and Learning in Children's Lives."
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  In both France and England, students scored in the middle-to-high 
ranks on the International Assessment of Educational Progress, with 
large gaps between low and high achievers.  Despite attempts to 
democratize education, educational achievement in both countries 
continues to be strongly linked to parents' social background, with 
limited access to elite schools.  (KS)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Access to Education; 
Comparative Education; *Cultural Context; *Educational Attitudes; 
Educational History; Elementary Secondary Education; *Equal Education; 
Foreign Countries; Mathematics Achievement; Sex Differences; Social 
Class; *Track System (Education)
  Identifiers: *England; *France; International Assessment of 
Educational Progress; Science Achievement


  
  EJ486982  RC510109
  Children's Lives and Academic Achievement in Canada and the United 
States.
  Gaffield, Chad
  Comparative Education Review, v38 n1 p36-64 Feb   1994
  Theme issue topic: "Schooling and Learning in Children's Lives."
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  The quite average performance of children in Canada and the United 
States on the International Assessment of Educational Progress is 
consistent with the foundations of school systems in both countries, 
which emphasize a sociocultural rather than academic purpose.  Recent 
changes in Quebec stress education for academic reasons, with 
resulting improvements in achievement.  (KS)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Education; 
*Educational Attitudes; *Educational History; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Mathematics Achievement; *Role of Education; Socialization
  Identifiers: *Canada; International Assessment of Educational 
Progress; Quebec; Science Achievement; *United States


  
  EJ486981  RC510108
  Success and Education in South Korea.
  Sorensen, Clark W.
  Comparative Education Review, v38 n1 p10-35 Feb   1994
  Theme issue topic: "Schooling and Learning in Children's Lives."
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  South Korean students scored better than students from 18 other 
countries on math and science achievement tests.  In South Korea, 
economic social status for oneself and one's family are directly 
related to educational level.  This, plus intense pressure from 
parents and authoritarian teachers, motivates students to score well 
on competitive national exams for high school and college admission.  
(KS)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Educational Attainment; 
*Educational Attitudes; Educational History; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Family Structure; Foreign Countries; Higher Education; 
Mathematics Achievement; *Parent Participation; *Social Values; 
Socioeconomic Status; Student Attitudes; *Student Motivation; Student 
Responsibility
  Identifiers: International Assessment of Educational Progress; 
Science Achievement; *South Korea


  
  EJ486980  RC510107
  The Developing Schoolchild as Historical Actor.
  Modell, John
  Comparative Education Review, v38 n1 p1-9 Feb   1994
  Theme issue topic: "Schooling and Learning in Children's Lives."
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  POSITION PAPER (120);  
JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Introduces the theme of this issue, which expands comparative 
education topics inward, toward the developmental perspective of the 
child, and outward, toward culture, historically situated.  Discusses 
findings from the International Assessment of Educational Progress in 
terms of cultural differences in children's attitudes toward learning.  
(KS)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Child Development; *Comparative 
Education; *Cultural Differences; *Educational Attitudes; Elementary 
Secondary Education; *Learning Processes; *Student Attitudes; Values
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  ED382659  TM023093
  On the Academic Achievement of New Jersey's Public School Children: 
I. Fourth and Eighth Grade Mathematics in 1992. Program Statistics 
Research Technical Report No. 94-3.
  Wainer, Howard
  May 1994
  22p.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  This report is the beginning of a series that will examine the 
performance of the school children of New Jersey relative to the 
performance of other children in the United States and worldwide.  
The measure of performance used was the 1992 National Assessment of 
Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics examinations and their linked 
versions of the 1991 International Assessment.  The NAEP is used 
because it is satisfactory in content and form and because the 
psychometric model underlying its scoring yields a single scale that 
allows easy comparison.  Students sampled by the NAEP are drawn in a 
principled way from the populations of interest, supporting the 
accuracy and honesty of the assessment.  Based on unstandardized 
results of the 1992 mathematics assessment, New Jersey was among the 
highest performing states.  When results were standardized to reflect 
a single national demographic composition, New Jersey's rank among 
participating states rose to fourth.  The United States, however, 
finished next-to-last when compared with the other 14 nations.  The 
top 5% of New Jersey students ranked third when compared with the top 
5% of members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development.  Seven figures illustrate the discussion.  (Contains 10 
references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; 
Demography; Elementary School Students; Grade 4; Grade 8; 
Intermediate Grades; Junior High Schools; *Mathematics; Mathematics 
Tests; *Public Schools; Scoring; Secondary School Students; State 
Programs; *Test Results
  Identifiers: International Assessment of Educational Progress; 
National Assessment of Educational Progress; *New Jersey


  
  ED373962  SE054505
  Elementary School Teachers' Instructional Behavior in Mathematics 
Problem Solving: A Comparative Study.
  Zambo, Ron; Hong, Eunsook
  Apr 1994
  17p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 5-8, 1994).
  Document Type: CONFERENCE PAPER (150);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  The results of the International Assessment of Educational 
Progress released in February 1992 indicate that in mathematics and 
science the United States ranks near the bottom, while South Korea 
and Taiwan rank at the top.  This paper compares the nature of 
mathematical problem-solving instruction in Korean elementary schools 
to that in American elementary schools.  Questionnaires that attempt 
to determine teachers' use of instructional strategies to promote 
problem solving, teachers' perceptions of the usefulness of specific 
problem-solving strategies, teachers' confidence in using those 
strategies, and beliefs concerning specific recommendations for 
problem-solving instruction were given to 164 Korean teachers from 7 
urban public elementary schools (grade levels 1-6) in Seoul and 195 
American teachers of grade levels 1-6 from 10 elementary schools from 
school districts in Phoenix, Arizona.  Korean and American teachers 
reported similar amounts of time spent each week on mathematics 
instruction and problem solving; however the Korean school year is 44 
days longer than the American school year.  Korean teachers perceived 
textbooks as being more useful for problem-solving instruction, used 
less student grouping as an instructional technique, and used 
manipulatives less frequently.  (MKR)
  Descriptors: Beliefs; Comparative Analysis; Comparative Education; 
Cross Cultural Studies; Elementary Education; *Elementary School 
Teachers; Foreign Countries; *Mathematics Instruction; *Problem 
Solving; Questionnaires; *Teacher Attitudes; *Teaching Methods; *Time 
Management
  Identifiers: Arizona (Phoenix); South Korea


  EJ472580  EA528660
  Assessment of Student Achievement: National and International 
Perspectives.
  Levine, Daniel U.; Ornstein, Allan C.
  NASSP Bulletin, v77 n556 p46-59 Nov   1993
  ISSN: 0192-6365
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  International studies may be underestimating U.S. math and science 
performance in relation to other countries.  Such studies may be 
comparing U.S. students with more elite groups of students elsewhere.  
Lower performance may result from cultural differences and lower U.S. 
education expenditures.  Substantive improvement depends on increased 
planning time and staff development, reduced class sizes, and school 
reorganization.  (20 references) (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
Educational Trends; *International Cooperation; Secondary Education; 
*Student Evaluation; *Test Results
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress; 
*International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED358105  TM019871
  Item Response Theory Scaling with Heterogeneous Populations.
  Blais, Jean-Guy
  Apr 1993
  49p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (Atlanta, GA, April 12-16, 1993).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Tools used in scaling proficiency scores from the Second 
International Assessment of Educational Progress (IAEP) are described.  
The second IAEP study, conducted in 1991, was an international 
comparative study of the mathematics and science skills of samples of 
9- and 13-year-old students from 20 countries.  This paper focuses on 
part of the second stage of data analysis, work done in creating a 
unique scale for all the participating populations, that is, creating 
reference populations, scaling methodology, and linkage of 9- and 13-
year-old populations.  All populations contributed to four combined 
reference populations, superpopulations, one for each age group by 
mathematics and science combination.  The item response theory 
scaling model is the three-parameter logistic model.  Linking was 
accomplished through a small set of common items included in the 9- 
and 13-year-old assessments in each subject area.  Results show that 
even if on an item-by-item basis the equating gives results that are 
not ideal, when all items are taken into account, student proficiency 
scores estimated with both sets of item parameter estimates can be 
considered to be on the same scale.  Results further indicate that no 
information has been lost as a result of using one set of item 
parameter estimates over another.  Fourteen tables and 16 figures 
present analysis data.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Adolescents; Cross Cultural 
Studies; Data Analysis; Elementary School Students; Equated Scores; 
Estimation (Mathematics); Foreign Countries; International Studies; 
*Item Response Theory; Junior High Schools; *Junior High School 
Students; *Mathematics Tests; Preadolescents; Primary Education; 
*Reference Groups; Sampling; *Scaling; *Science Tests; Scores
  Identifiers: Diversity (Student); Item Parameters; Linkage; *Second 
International Assessment of Ed Progress; Three Parameter Model


  
  ED406128  SE052823
  Learning Science.
  Lapointe, Archie E.; And Others
  Feb 1992
  164p.; Supplementary Funds provided by the Carnegie Corporation of 
New York.
  ISBN: 0-88685-121-1
  Available From: Center for the Assessment of Educational Programs 
(CAEP), Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton, NJ 
08541-0001.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  This publication reports the results of the second International 
Assessment of Educational Progress for science.  Twenty countries 
assessed the mathematics and science achievement of 13-year-old 
students and 14 countries assessed 9-year-old students in these same 
subjects.  In some cases, participants assessed virtually all age-
eligible children in their countries and in other cases they confined 
samples to certain geographic regions, language groups, or grade 
levels.  In some countries, significant proportions of age-eligible 
children were not represented because they did not attend school.  
The following countries participated: Brazil, Canada, China, England, 
France, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Korea, Mozambique, 
Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, Soviet Union, Spain, Switzerland, 
Taiwan, and the United States.  Some of the reported highlights from 
the study are as follows: (1) in nearly all populations 13-year-old 
boys performed significantly better than girls; (2) science tests and 
quizzes are used most frequently in Taiwan, the Soviet Union, the 
United States, and Jordan; (3) the highest-achieving countries with 
the exception of Taiwan do not practice ability grouping within 
science classes at age 13; and (4) 13-year-olds in most countries do 
not spend a great deal of time doing science homework.  (PR)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
*Comparative Testing; *Cross Cultural Studies; Developing Nations; 
Educational Research; Educational Testing; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Family Influence; *Foreign Countries; Homework; 
Intermediate Grades; *Science Education; Science Tests
  Identifiers: International Assessment of Educational Progress; 
*Science Achievement


  
  EJ464894  UD517263
  Quality Criteria for Maximizing the Use of Research.
  McEwen, Nelly
  Educational Researcher, v21 n7 p20-22,27-32 Oct   1992
  ISSN: 0013-189X
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Identifies important criteria for assessing the quality of 
educational research and applies these 20 identified criteria to 2 
recent international comparative studies in education, the Second 
International Science Study and the first International Assessment of 
Educational Progress.  The major types of criteria are utility, 
propriety, and accuracy.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis; Cross Cultural Studies; 
Educational Assessment; *Educational Research; *Evaluation Criteria; 
Evaluation Methods; Evaluation Utilization; Foreign Countries; 
*International Studies; *Quality Control; Research Methodology; 
Research Problems; *Research Utilization; Secondary Education; 
Testing Programs
  Identifiers: Accuracy; *International Assessment of Educational 
Progress; Large Scale Programs; *Second International Mathematics 
Study


  
  ED350354  TM019135
  Learning about the World.
  Lazer, Stephen
  Jun 1992
  111p.
  ISBN: 0-88685-122-X
  Available From: Center for the Assessment of Educational Progress, 
Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton, NJ 08541-0001.
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL 
(110)
  As a step toward acquiring international measures of geographic 
competence of students, an optional geography component was included 
in the second International Assessment of Educational Progress.  Nine 
of the 20 countries participating in the assessment included the 
geography component, including 8 provinces.  In each country a 
representative sample of 13-year-olds was assessed, a total of about 
3,300 students.  The assessment contained 24 content-area questions 
and 14 background questions covering geographic skills and tools, 
physical geography, and cultural geography.  National differences in 
performance on the geography probe were less pronounced than they 
were in the mathematics and science portions of the assessment.  
Overall, students performed better on questions involving map reading 
and chart reading than on questions that combined use of such skills 
with prior knowledge of geographic vocabulary, process, or location.  
There were consistent relationships between books in the home, family 
size, and leisure reading and achievement, but the relationship of 
television and time spent on homework to achievement was less clear.  
Issues in developing and administering similar international 
assessments are discussed.  Eleven figures, 12 tables, 15 sample test 
questions, a procedural appendix, and a data appendix are included.  
(SLD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Adolescents; Family Environment; 
Geographic Concepts; Geography; *Geography Instruction; Homework; 
*International Studies; Junior High Schools; *Junior High School 
Students; *Map Skills; Recreational Reading; Social Studies; 
Television Viewing
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  ED350353  TM019134
  Performance Assessment: An International Experiment.
  Semple, Brian McLean
  Jul 1992
  61p.
  ISBN: 0-88685-127-0
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  TEST, QUESTIONNAIRE (160); 
 STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110)
  The second International Assessment of Educational Progress focused 
on the mathematics and science achievement of 13-year-olds.  
Performance assessments were used as part of the overall assessment 
in four countries (England, Scotland, Soviet Union, and Taiwan) and 
five Canadian provinces.  The performance assessment approach drew 
heavily on the experience of the United Kingdom in such assessments, 
but added features to meet the needs of an international study.  The 
performance tasks required students to apply concepts, observe, 
measure, manipulate equipment and materials, and record and interpret 
data.  Approximately 3,000 students participated in the 1991 
mathematics and science assessments.  Scores varied widely from task 
to task and from country to country.  Relative performance of 
countries and provinces generally differed from those identified by 
written curriculum-based tests.  A major lesson learned from the 
experimental test administration is that this form of performance 
assessment can be used reliably in international comparative studies 
although at an estimated cost three to four times greater than that 
for an equivalent number of written test questions.  Sample 
mathematics and science tasks are included, and there is an appendix 
on problem solving in mathematics that describes outcomes produced by 
Scottish students.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Adolescents; Comparative Testing; 
Educational Assessment; Foreign Countries; *International Studies; 
Junior High Schools; *Junior High School Students; *Mathematics 
Achievement; *Problem Solving; *Sciences; Scores; Student Evaluation; 
Test Construction; Test Results
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress; 
*Performance Based Evaluation


  
  ED347081  SE052822
  Learning Mathematics.
  Lapointe, Archie E.; And Others
  Feb 1992
  163p.; Supplementary funds provided by the Carnegie Corporation of 
New York.
  ISBN: 0-88685-120-3
  Available From: Center for the Assessment of Educational Progress, 
Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton, NJ 08541-0001.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  In 1990-91, 20 countries (Brazil, Canada, China, England, France, 
Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Korea, Mozambique, Portugal, 
Scotland, Slovenia, Soviet Union, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, and the 
United States) surveyed the mathematics and science performance of 13-
year-old students (and 14 countries also assessed 9-year-olds in the 
same subjects) as part of the second International Assessment of 
Educational Progress (IAEP) Project.  While recognizing the 
fundamental differences from country to country, the participants 
assembled tests that focus on the common elements of their 
curriculums, and in order to form the contexts for interpreting the 
student achievement data, they added sets of questions about 
students' home background and classroom experiences and the 
characteristics of the schools they attended.  Results are reported 
in six chapters that discuss the following: (1) the mathematics 
performance of 13-year-olds; (2) results organized around topics 
featured in the curriculum; (3) results reporting students' and 
administrators' perceptions of teaching practices and their 
relationship to student performance; (4) information about the 
backgrounds of students and how they spend their time outside of 
school; (5) information about physical, demographic, and 
socioeconomic characteristics and the educational systems of the 
participating countries; and (6) the mathematics performance of 9-
year-olds.  Other sections present highlights of the findings 
discussed in detail in the main chapters, information about the 
participating countries, a procedural appendix discussing the 
research methods used by the countries, and a data appendix providing 
tables of results reported in the main chapters.  (MDH)
  Descriptors: Attitude Measures; Classroom Environment; Comparative 
Analysis; Elementary Education; Family Environment; Foreign Countries; 
Homework; International Education; International Programs; 
*Mathematics Achievement; Mathematics Education; Mathematics 
Instruction; *Student Attitudes; Student Behavior; *Student 
Characteristics; *Student Evaluation; Surveys; Teaching Methods; 
Television Viewing
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  EJ419469  UD515553
  International Comparative Research in Education: Its Role in 
Educational Improvement in the U.S.
  Torney-Purta, Judith
  Educational Researcher, v19 n7 p32-35 Oct   1990
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  
EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  Describes the following organizations concerned with international 
comparative educational research: (1) the International Association 
for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); (2) the 
International Assessment of Educational Progress (IAEP); (3) the 
Board of International Comparative Studies in Education; and (4) the 
International Educational Indicators Project.  Suggests areas for new 
research.  (FMW)
  Descriptors: Achievement Rating; Comparative Analysis; *Comparative 
Education; *Comparative Testing; Educational Research; Foreign 
Countries; *International Education; *International Organizations; 
*International Programs; Program Descriptions; Research Needs
  Identifiers: *Research Suggestions; United States


 
  EJ417184  RC508072
  Let's Call a Halt to Pointless Testing.
  McLean, Les
  Education Canada, v30 n3 p10-13 Fall   1990
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  POSITION PAPER (120)
  Educational Testing Service's (ETS) international testing of 
student achievement (1988) was supported by politicians seeking 
simple answers, but results were badly flawed and pointless.  ETS 
emphasized global comparisons among countries on a single achievement 
scale, using an arbitrary formula heavily weighted toward 
computation; actual questions are secret and hence students may have 
questions different from what educators see.  (SV)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; *Achievement Tests; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Testing; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *Testing Problems; *Test Use; Test Validity
  Identifiers: *Educational Testing Service; *International 
Assessment of Educational Progress

[Table of Contents]

ERIC Documents Citations for the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement

  EJ534079  EA532723
  Reassessing a Learning Gap: A Comparative Study of Student Science 
Achievement in the U.S. and China.
  Wang, Jianjun
  Phi Delta Kappan, v78 n3 p234-39 Nov   1996
  ISSN: 0031-7217
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  
JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Reviews current literature related to the science achievement 
"learning gap" between Chinese and U.S. students.  Presents an 
empirical assessment based on a more representative database from 
both countries.  An extended mid-1980s study (the Second 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement Study, or SSIS), found no appreciable learning gap 
between U.S. and Chinese students.  (38 references) (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
*Economic Factors; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
*Misconceptions; *Science Education
  Identifiers: *China; *United States


  
  ED402570  CS012688
  Reading Literacy in an International Perspective: Collected Papers 
from the IEA Reading Literacy Study.
  Binkley, Marilyn, Ed.; And Others
  Dec 1996
  253p.
  ISBN: 0-16-048957-1
  Available From: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of 
Documents, Mail Stop: SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-9328.
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Presenting nine papers from the IEA (International Association for 
the Evaluation of Educational Achievement) Reading Literacy Study 
that place results in an international perspective, this report 
address factors related to variation in literacy outcomes, both 
across and within countries; the teaching of reading; and the quality 
of life in schools.  The nations focused on in the report are 
Denmark, Finland, France, the former West Germany, Italy, Spain, 
Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States.  Papers in the report are 
"Social Inequality, Social Segregation, and Their Relationship to 
Reading Literacy in 22 Countries" (Stephen W. Raudenbush and others); 
"A Nine-Country Study: What Were the Differences between the Low- and 
High-Performing Students in the IEA Reading Literacy Study?" (Karin 
Taube and Jan Mejding); "Reading Literacy among Immigrant Students in 
the United States and the Former West Germany" (Rainer Lehmann); 
"Comparison of Reading Literacy across Languages in Spanish Fourth 
Graders" (Guillermo A. Gil and others); "Teaching Reading in the 
United States and Finland" (Marilyn R. Binkley and Pirjo Linnakyla); 
"A Nine-Country Study: How Do Teachers Teach Reading to 9-Year-Olds?" 
(Emilie Barrier and Daniel Robin); "Consistencies in the Quality of 
School Life" (Trevor Williams and Stephen Roey); "Quality of School 
Life in the Finnish- and Swedish-Speaking Schools in Finland" (Pirjo 
Linnakyla and Viking Brunell); and "Analysis of the Williams and 
Batten Questionnaire on the Quality of School Life in Spain" 
(Guillermo A. Gil).  (RS)
  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis; Cross Cultural Studies; 
*Educational Environment; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign 
Countries; Immigrants; *Literacy; Questionnaires; *Reading 
Achievement; *Reading Instruction; Reading Research; School Culture; 
Teaching Methods
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED396245  CS012485
  Reading Literacy in the United States. Findings from the IEA 
Reading Literacy Study.
  Binkley, Marilyn; Williams, Trevor
  1996
  82p.
  ISBN: 0-16-048670-X
  Available From: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of 
Documents, Mail Stop: SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-9328.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Using data from the 1991 IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) Reading Literacy Study, a 
study compared United States fourth- and ninth-grade students to 
students in 32 other countries; examined relationships between 
reading comprehension and aspects of family, schooling, and 
community; and investigated the nature of reading instruction in 
American classrooms.  National samples of classes at the grade level 
containing the most 9-year-olds and 14-year-olds were used.  A "world 
average" was constructed of the 18 participating nations that are 
also members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development (OECD).  Results indicated that (1) American fourth 
graders outperformed students from all other countries except 
Finland; (2) American ninth graders' performance was closely grouped 
with that of students from 15 other nations; (3) in the United 
States, White students read better than Black and Hispanic students; 
(4) most groups of American students outperformed the OECD average; 
(5) students whose parents did not finish high school read at about 
the same level as the OECD average at fourth grade, but fell below 
the average in the ninth grade; (6) when differences in wealth, 
race/ethnicity, level of parental education, and other related 
attributes were taken into account, children from one-parent mother-
only families did as well as children from two-parent families; (7) 
parents' educational attainment influenced reading comprehension over 
and above other aspects of family background; (8) what teachers said 
they believed about reading instruction differed markedly from what 
they actually did and had students do.  (Contains 70 references, 43 
notes, 4 exhibits, 3 tables, and 29 figures of data.) (RS)
  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis; Cross Cultural Studies; *Family 
Environment; Grade 4; Grade 9; Intermediate Grades; Junior High 
Schools; *Literacy; Racial Differences; *Reading Achievement; 
*Reading Comprehension; Reading Research; *Teacher Attitudes; 
*Teacher Behavior
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED394731  PS024198
  A Comparative Study of Early Childhood Programs in 15 Countries. 
The IEA Preprimary Project.
  Olmsted, Patricia P.
  Feb 1996
  36p.
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  The Preprimary Project is a comprehensive comparative study of 
early childhood services in nations on four continents.  This report 
describes the project, the instrument devised to measure the 
project's effectiveness, and some preliminary findings.  The project 
is sponsored by the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement (IEA) and has interrelated phases: (1) Phase 
1: a household survey exploring the use of early childhood services 
by families in 11 countries; (2) Phase 2: 15 countries are involved 
in observation and interviews to assess the quality of children's 
experiences in the various care/education settings identified in 
Phase 1; and (3) Phase 3: an age-7 follow-up study of the children 
observed in Phase 2, including an assessment of their developmental 
status and their progress since the end of their preprimary 
experience.  The instruments used in these phases were developed 
through a multi-step, collaborative process.  Preliminary findings 
include the following: (1) teachers and parents agreed in their 
assessments of the importance of various educational goals; (2) 
teachers in Belgium, China, Finland, Greece, Hong Kong, Indonesia, 
Italy, Slovenia, and the United States ranked as most important 
categories of social skills with peers, self-sufficiency skills, and 
language skills; (3) in most countries, at least 75 percent of early 
childhood teachers are certified; (4) low percentages of certified 
teachers are found in Hong Kong (36 percent in kindergartens, 22 
percent in day care), Thailand (10 percent in child care centers), 
and China (37 percent in rural kindergartens).  Three appendices 
include Phase 2 measures, categories used in the three observation 
systems, and national sampling information.  (JW)
  Descriptors: *Child Development; Comparative Analysis; Cross 
Cultural Studies; Day Care; Developed Nations; Developing Nations; 
*Early Childhood Education; Foreign Countries; Observation; *Parent 
Attitudes; Preschool Children; Program Effectiveness; Program 
Evaluation; *Teacher Qualifications; *Test Construction
  Identifiers: Africa; Asia; Europe; *IEA Preprimary Project; North 
America


  
  ED392841  TM024667
  A Confirmatory Factor Analysis and a Group Comparison Analysis of 
the IEA Student Attitude Questionnaire.
  Gadalla, Tahany
  Apr 1995
  14p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 18-22, 
1995).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  The Second International Mathematics Study was conducted in 20 
countries under the sponsorship of the International Association for 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA).  Among the instruments 
used in this study was a questionnaire investigating student 
attitudes about school, instruction, and mathematics.  The fit of an 
a priori model that postulates the relationships between observed 
responses to sets of items comprising different scales and the latent 
traits the scales are designed to indicate was studied.  The 
hypothesis of equality of factor structure for boys and girls was 
also tested.  Data were from 13-year-old Canadian students, 2,422 
boys and 2,401 girls.  The PRELIS computer program was used to 
compute the polychoric correlations and the asymptotic covariance 
matrices for the response data, using listwise deletion of missing 
responses.  Analyses made it apparent that most items needed 
revision, that they had poor reliability, and that they seemed to be 
measuring a mixture of traits.  Insufficient evidence was found 
concerning the hypothesis that boys and girls had the same factor 
pattern.  The validity of international comparisons from survey 
responses has not been established.  (Contains two figures and three 
tables.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Analysis; Cross Cultural Studies; *Factor 
Structure; Foreign Countries; *Goodness of Fit; International 
Education; Models; Questionnaires; Sex Differences; *Student 
Attitudes; *Test Items; Test Reliability; Test Use; Test Validity
  Identifiers: Canada; Confirmatory Factor Analysis; *International 
Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; Missing Data; *Second International 
Mathematics Study


  
  ED386952  FL023269
  National Profile of the United States. International Association 
for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement Language Education 
Study.
  1995
  96p.; Research report submitted to the National Foundation for 
Educational Research in England and Wales for incorporation into the 
IEA/LES Database (September, 1995).
  Document Type: NON-CLASSROOM MATERIAL (055);  REVIEW LITERATURE 
(070)
  Target Audience: Practitioners
  This National Profile has been prepared as the United States' 
participation in Phase I of the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement's international study of 
language learning on the secondary level.  It presents a complete 
outline of the state of foreign language learning in the United 
States from grades 1-12 for some college information, based on an 
international questionnaire distributed by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement on 
education at the secondary level.  Details are provided on 
demographic, socio-economic, and educational information; socio-
linguistic context; language policy; language curriculum and 
assessment; and language teaching and professional support.  The 
structure of the U.S. educational system from pre-school to grade 12 
is outlined, and an English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) addendum 
responds to questions about the general state of ESL teaching in the 
United States.  Information is listed by foreign language for number 
of students, teachers, hours taught, trade contacts, and textbooks 
used and their contents.  (Contains numerous references.) 
(Author/NAV)
  Descriptors: Curriculum Design; *Demography; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *English (Second Language); Higher Education; 
Instructional Materials; Language Planning; Language Teachers; 
Questionnaires; *Second Language Instruction; *Second Language 
Learning; Socioeconomic Status; Sociolinguistics; Testing
  Identifiers: *National Foundation for Educational Research


  
  ED385826  CS012229
  Curriculum and Assessment Issues: Messages for Teachers. Children 
Learning To Read: International Concerns, Volume 2.
  Owen, Pamela, Ed.; Pumfrey, Peter, Ed.
  1995
  227p.; For volume 1, see CS 012 228.
  ISBN: 0-7507-0366-0
  Available From: Falmer Press, Taylor and Francis, Inc., 1900 Frost 
Road, Suite 101, Bristol, PA 19007-1598 (hardback: ISBN-0-7507-0365-
2; paperback: ISBN-0-7507-0366-0).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  TEACHING GUIDE (052)
  Target Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
  Providing an international perspective on how children learn to 
read, this second of 2 volumes presents research studies and 
classroom experiences from the United Kingdom, the United States, 
Canada, Australia, Jamaica, and Israel, drawing on evidence from 18 
countries.  Essays in the volumes highlight implications for design, 
implementation, and evaluation of classroom reading programs.  These 
two volumes address the 3 major concerns of those involved in how 
children become literate and by what means such achievements may be 
appraised.  They are: developing understanding of the nature of 
children's early reading development; considering ways in which 
children's reading can be encouraged; and the assessment of reading 
standards.  Following an introduction ("International Concerns and 
Controversies" by P. Pumfrey and P. Owen), essays in the second 
volume are: (1) "Expanding the Dimensions of World Literacy" (C.  
Foley); (2) "Children's Learning and the New English Curriculum" (B.  
Raban-Bisby); (3) "The Ecology of Sense-Making: The Literacy-
learner's Dilemma" (M.  Bogle); (4) "The Avon Collaborative Reading 
Study" (T.  Gorman); (5) "Writing Systems in Different Languages: A 
Factor Affecting Literacy Standards?" (C.  Upward); (6) "'Equal-
Plus': A New Initial-teaching Orthography" (N.  Atkinson); (7) 
"Defining the Reading Domain: Is a Curriculum Definition Sufficient 
To Establish a Standard?" (T.  Christie); (8) "A Framework for 
Literacy Assessment" (P.  Smith); (9) "Reading Standards at Key Stage 
1 in Schools in England and Wales: Aspiration and Evidence" (P.  
Pumfrey); (10) "Teachers as Participants in the National Reading 
Examinations" (E.  Meiselles); (11) "A Comparison of Teacher 
Strategies, Aims and Activities in Two Countries Participating in the 
IEA Reading-Literacy Study" (V.  Froese); and (12) "The IEA Study of 
Reading Literacy" (P.  Allerup).  (RS)
  Descriptors: *Beginning Reading; Curriculum Development; Elementary 
Education; *English Curriculum; *Evaluation Methods; Foreign 
Countries; Global Approach; Reading Achievement; Reading Instruction; 
Reading Motivation; Reading Research; *Student Evaluation
  Identifiers: Educational Issues; *Emergent Literacy; International 
Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; *International Trends


  
  ED385057  EC304090
  A Perspective on Education and Assessment in Other Nations: Where 
Are Students with Disabilities? Synthesis Report 19.
  Elliott, Judy L.; And Others
  Apr 1995
  58p.
  Available From: NCEO, 350 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Rd., 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($15).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  This report reviews five major international comparative studies on 
educational practices, assessment systems, and educational outcomes 
for students with disabilities.  The five studies reviewed are: (1) 
the Reading Literacy Survey conducted by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); (2) 
the International Assessment of Educational Progress of the 
Educational Testing Service; (3) the Third International Mathematics 
and Science Study; (4) the International Education Indicators Project 
of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development; and 
(5) the Computers in Education Study to be conducted by the IEA.  The 
report notes differences in sampling procedures and the extent to 
which students with disabilities participate in the assessments.  The 
report also reviews the educational and assessment systems of 14 
countries, focusing on the participation of students with 
disabilities.  Educational assessment systems in the following 
countries are described: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, China, 
England and Wales, France, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Nigeria, 
Sweden, Tunisia, and the United States.  Each country description 
includes information on the general education system, including age 
of entry and duration of schooling, educational policies and 
procedures for students with disabilities, how decisions are made 
about placements, assessment practices, and the reporting of 
assessment results.  (Contains 86 references.) (DB)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
Decision Making; *Disabilities; *Educational Assessment; Educational 
Practices; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
International Studies; *Outcomes of Education; Sampling; Special 
Education; *Student Evaluation; Student Participation; Student 
Placement
  Identifiers: Computers in Education (IEA); International Assessment 
of Educational Progress; International Educational Indicators; 
*International Surveys; Reading Literacy Survey; Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


  
  ED383761  TM023297
  International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of 
Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies.
  1995
  129p.
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Since its inception in 1988, the Board on International Comparative 
Studies in Education (BICSE) has monitored U.S. participation in 
those cross national comparative studies in education that are funded 
by its sponsors, the National Science Foundation and the National 
Center for Education Statistics.  This set of international study 
descriptions represents a status report on 17 projects presented to 
BICSE at various times in 1994.  Reports were prepared by the 
projects themselves and are presented without evaluation or editing.  
The following are described: (1) "Case Studies of U.S.  Innovations 
in Mathematics, Science, and Technology in an International Context" 
(National Center for Improving Science Education and other agencies); 
(2) "Civics Education Study" (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement); (3) "Comparative Study of 
Teacher Training and Professional Development Practices in APEC (Asia 
Pacific Economic Co-operation) Members" (Asia Pacific Economic Co-
operation Ministerial); (4) "Computers in Education Study" (
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement  IEA ); (5) "Cross-national Studies of Adult 
Understanding of Science" (Chicago Academy of Sciences); (6) 
"Education Indicators Project (INES)" (Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development); (7) "International Adult Literacy 
Study" (Statistics Canada); (8) "International Assessment of 
Educational Progress" (Educational Testing Service); (9) 
"International Comparative Study of Mathematics and Science Tests" 
(National Center for Improving Science Education); (10) 
"International Study of Teachers' Attitudes toward Reform and Teacher 
Preparation for Implementing Reform" (George Washington University 
Institute for Curriculum Standards and Technology); (11) "Language 
Education Study" (IEA); (12) "New Standards Project (benchmark 
activities)" (Learning Research and Development Center at the 
University of Pittsburgh and National Center on Education and the 
Economy); (13) "Preprimary Project" (IEA); (14) "Reading Literacy 
Study" (IEA); (15) "Study on Performance Standards in Education" (U.S.  
Department of Education); (16) "Survey of Mathematics and Science 
Opportunity" (Michigan State University); and (17) "Third 
International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) (including 
special U.S.  TIMSS activities)" (IEA).  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Computer 
Uses in Education; Cross Cultural Studies; *Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; *International Studies; Literacy; 
Mathematics; *National Surveys; Program Descriptions; Program 
Evaluation; Reading; Sciences; *Teacher Education
  Identifiers: *Educational Indicators; International Assn Evaluation 
Educ Achievement


  ED378570  CS011992
  Methodological Issues in Comparative Educational Studies: The Case 
of the IEA Reading Literacy Study.
  Binkley, Marilyn, Ed.; And Others
  Jan 1995
  293p.
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020)
  This report discusses various methodological issues confronted in 
the Reading Literacy Study conducted under the auspices of the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA) and issues relating to analysis of the data.  The 
study analyzed in the report involved fourth- and ninth-grade 
students (9-year-olds and 14-year-olds) in 32 countries.  Chapters in 
the report are: (1) "Issues in Sampling for International Comparative 
Studies in Education: The Case of the IEA Reading Literacy Study" 
(Keith Rust); (2) "Estimation, Sampling Errors, and Design Effects" 
(Edward Bryant); (3) "Handling Item Nonresponse in the U.S.  
Component of the IEA Reading Literacy Study" (Marianne Winglee and 
others); (4) "Assessing the Dimensionality of the IEA Reading 
Literacy Data" (Nadir Atash); (5) "Exploring the Possibilities of 
Constructed-Response Items" (Barbara Kapinus and Nadir Atash); (6) 
"Interpreting the IEA Reading Literacy Scales" (Irwin S. Kirsch and 
Peter B. Mosenthal); (7) Creating a Measure of Reading Instruction" 
(Marilyn R. Binkley and others); (8) "Hierarchical Models: The Case 
of School Effects on Literacy" (Steve W. Raudenbush); and (9) 
"Synthesizing Cross-National Classroom Effects Data: Alternative 
Models and Methods" (Steven W. Raudenbush and others).  Contains 30 
references.  An appendix presents empirical Bayes and Bayes 
estimation theory for two-level models with normal errors.  (RS)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Analysis; *Cross Cultural Studies; *Data 
Interpretation; Global Approach; Grade 4; Grade 9; Intermediate 
Grades; Junior High Schools; Methods Research; *Reading Achievement; 
*Reading Research; Research Design; *Research Methodology
  Identifiers: *Cross National Studies; International Assn Evaluation 
Educ Achievement


  
  ED404111  SE054192
  The Effect of the Science Learning Environment on Science 
Achievement and Equity.
  Young, Deidra J.
  Jan 1994
  32p.; Paper presented at the Meeting of the International Congress 
for School Effectiveness and Improvement (Melbourne, Victoria, 
Australia, January 3-6, 1994).
  Document Type: CONFERENCE PAPER (150);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  
TEST, QUESTIONNAIRE (160)
  In 1983/84, the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement (IEA) conducted their second international 
science study to investigate two factors related to student 
achievement in science: (1) the relationship between students' 
reported perceptions of the science learning environment and their 
science achievement; and (2) the effect of various science learning 
environment scales on gender and socioeconomic differences in science 
achievement.  Participants included 10-year-old, 14-year-old (focus 
in this report), and grade 12 students from 12 of the 24 
countries/educational systems in the original study.  Although the 
countries appeared incomparable in terms of their educational 
systems, results revealed that one commonality that exists between 
all countries examined is an increased practical work component in 
science lessons associated with improved science achievement by 
students.  Furthermore, the variability found in science achievement 
outcomes from school to school supports the assertion that the 
student's learning environment has an effect on achievement outcomes.  
The test instrument for 14-year-old students is appended.  (ZWH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Classroom Research; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Environment; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *Equal Education; Foreign Countries; Mathematics Education; 
*School Location; *Science Education; Sex Differences; *Socioeconomic 
Status


  
  ED391574  PS023576
  Families Speak: Early Childhood Care and Education in 11 Countries. 
The IEA Preprimary Project, Phase 1.
  Olmsted, Patricia P., Ed.; Weikart, David P., Ed.
  1994
  397p.
  ISBN: 0-929816-89-7
  Available From: High/Scope Press, High/Scope Educational Research 
Foundation, 600 North River Street, Ypsilanti, MI 48198-2898.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110); 
 BOOK (010)
  This report presents Phase 1 of the International Association for 
the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) 3-phase Preprimary 
Project being conducted in 11 to 15 countries.  The project spans the 
years 1987 through 1997.  The Preprimary Project has been designed to 
be conducted in three interrelated phases: Phase 1, a household 
survey in each participating nation to determine the types of early 
care and education services used by families, some characteristics of 
these families, and daily-life patterns of 4-year-olds; Phase 2, an 
in-depth study of sample settings identified in Phase 1 to determine 
quality of care and education in various settings, to examine 
interactive and structural features of these settings, and to explore 
program and family factors on developmental status in 4-year-olds; 
Phase 3, follow-up studies of development and progress in Phase 1 
children at age 7. Initially, Phase 1 documented what 11 nations' 
official government policies have been historically toward early 
childhood services.  They are: Belgium, The People's Republic of 
China, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Nigeria, Portugal, Spain, 
Thailand, and the United States.  Notably, over 60% of all children 
surveyed spend at least some time in extraparental care or education 
settings.  Ten major findings resulted from the Phase 1 inquiries: 
(1) the trend from parent care to out-of-home care or education for 
preschoolers is linked to the movement of women into the paid 
workforce; (2) the trend toward extraparental care or education is 
not likely to be reversed; (3) most of the children receiving 
extraparental care or education do so in only one such setting; (4) 
these children spend from 17 to 55 hours per week in extraparental 
settings; (5) parents electing to keep their children at home did so 
for parent-related reasons; (6) most out-of-home care or education 
services are sponsored by government or religious groups; (7) few 
such settings or services offered comprehensive service; (8) without 
exception and irrespective of stage of economic development, in each 
country it was the mothers who took primary responsibility for 
preschooler's care and supervision; (9) nonfamilial caregivers spend 
a widely varying amount of time daily with these children and, in 
some of the countries, preschoolers are left alone for extended 
periods; (10) the majority of children spend most of the time at home 
or in an organized care center.  Commentary papers contain references.  
(ET)
  Descriptors: *Cross Cultural Studies; *Day Care; Early Childhood 
Education; *Early Experience; Employed Parents; Family Environment; 
Foreign Countries; Intercultural Communication; Mothers; Parent 
Attitudes; *Preschool Children
  Identifiers: Belgium; China; Finland; Germany; Hong Kong; *IEA 
Preprimary Project; International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Italy; Nigeria; Out of Home Care; Portugal; Spain; Thailand; United 
States


  
  ED376559  EA026247
  School Size Effects on Achievement in Secondary Education: Evidence 
from the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA.
  Luyten, Hans
  Apr 1994
  35p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 4-8, 1994).
  Document Type: CONFERENCE PAPER (150);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  This paper reports the results of an investigation into the 
relationship between school size and achievement.  The study examined 
the impact of school size on mathematics achievement in Dutch, 
Swedish, and American secondary education and on science achievement 
in the Netherlands.  The following research questions were explored: 
(1) Is school size related to achievement independently of student 
background characteristics, such as sex, achievement motivation, 
socioeconomic status, and cognitive aptitude? (2) Is the effect of 
school size related to any of the aforementioned background 
characteristics? (3) Does the effect of school size on achievement 
differ among the educational systems of the Netherlands, Sweden, and 
the United States? and (4) Is the effect of school size the same for 
different measures of student achievement (mathematics versus 
science)? Datasets from two international studies sponsored by the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement were analyzed--the Second International Mathematics Study 
(SIMS) and the Second International Science Study (SISS).  The 
findings found little empirical evidence for the existence of school-
size effects on achievement in any of the three countries, possibly 
because school size and curriculum comprehensiveness are not strongly 
related in these countries.  Some useful additional information 
regarding the robustness of the detected relationships between the 
five covariates and student achievement is presented.  Five tables 
are included.  Contains 39 references.  (LMI)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Effective Schools Research; 
Foreign Countries; Institutional Characteristics; *Mathematics 
Achievement; School Demography; *School Effectiveness; *School Size; 
Science Tests; Secondary Education
  Identifiers: *Netherlands; Science Achievement; *Sweden; *United 
States


  
  ED376174  TM022137
  Gender and Computer Use: Another Area of Inequity?
  Reinen, Ingeborg Janssen; Plomp, Tjeerd
  Apr 1994
  13p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 4-8, 1994).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Data from the Computers in Education project (Comped) are used to 
study the state of the art with respect to gender and computer use in 
a number of countries.  The Comped project of the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), 
which was conducted in about 20 countries in 1989, involved over 
70,000 students in 10 countries in 1992.  A Functional Information 
Technology Test was given to students in the Comped study.  Results 
indicate that the gender equity concerns of many educators, who fear 
computer use causes or preserves differences between male and female 
students, are well founded.  Females know less about information 
technology, enjoy using computers less, and perceive more software 
problems than males.  Sex of students is a factor with substantial 
influence on student achievement internationally.  Possible causes 
for the differences and what might be done about them are outlined.  
One table and five figures illustrate the analyses.  (Contains 10 
references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Access to Education; *Computer 
Uses in Education; *Educational Technology; Elementary School 
Students; Elementary Secondary Education; *Equal Education; *Females; 
Foreign Countries; International Studies; *Males; Secondary School 
Students; *Sex Differences; Technological Advancement
  Identifiers: *Computer Equity; Computers in Education (IEA)


  
  ED374968  SE054920
  The Enduring Effects of Productivity Factors on Eighth Grade 
Students' Mathematics Outcome.
  Ibe, Richard E.
  Apr 1994
  36p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 4-8, 1994).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Using Walberg's educational productivity model, this study 
estimated the influences of home environment, motivation, ability, 
classroom environment, quality of instruction, and instructional time 
on mathematics outcomes using longitudinal data from the Second 
International Mathematics Study (SIMS).  SIMS was a comprehensive 
survey of the teaching and learning of mathematics in 20 countries 
conducted by the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement.  The data incorporated measures collected at 
the beginning and the end of the academic school year.  The U.S. 
sample comprised 7,935 eighth-grade 13-year-old mathematics students 
in 299 classrooms.  Results indicate that attitude toward mathematics 
can be reliably assessed as mathematics outcome and that 
instructional time is a significant direct influence upon both 
mathematics achievement and attitude.  Contains 18 references.  (MKR)
  Descriptors: *Classroom Environment; Educational Quality; *Family 
Environment; Grade 8; Junior High Schools; *Junior High School 
Students; Longitudinal Studies; *Mathematics Achievement; Mathematics 
Instruction; Models; *Motivation; *Student Attitudes


  
  ED374774  IR016814
  What Do Students Know about Computers and Where Did They Learn It? 
Results from an International Comparative Survey.
  Brummelhuis, Alfons ten
  Apr 1994
  15p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 4-8, 1994).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  The purpose of this study was to determine if there are cross-
national factors that account for students' computer know-how.  The 
data used in the study were collected in the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement study on 
computers in education.  In 1992, data were collected in seven 
different countries about the use of computers in elementary and 
secondary schools.  A questionnaire was used to determine attitude 
scales, computer use at home, and scores on the Functional 
Information Technology Test (FITT) by students.  Teachers were asked 
to indicate whether the subject matter covered in each item of the 
FITT was taught before the testing.  The FITT consisted of 30 
multiple choice items designed to measure the general practical 
knowledge and skills students will need to use information technology.  
Results showed that, in all countries, the average level of 
achievement differs across schools.  Conclusions drawn from the 
analyses are that schools, student attitudes towards information 
technology, gender, and home background are meaningful factors in 
understanding differences in student achievement on functional 
information technology.  (JLB)
  Descriptors: Computer Assisted Instruction; *Computer Attitudes; 
*Computer Literacy; Educational Technology; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; Futures (of Society); Information 
Technology; Questionnaires; *Student Attitudes
  Identifiers: International Surveys; Netherlands (Enschede)


  
  ED372376  CS011796
  Reading Literacy in the United States: Technical Report of the U.S. 
Component of the IEA Reading Literacy Study.
  Binkley, Marilyn, Ed.; Rust, Keith, Ed.
  Aug 1994
  681p.; The study utilized contractual support from Westat, Data 
Recognition Inc., and the Council of Chief State School Officers 
(CCSSO).
  Available From: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government 
Printing Office, Mail Stop: SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-9328.
  Document Type: STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110);  TEST, QUESTIONNAIRE 
(160)
  This technical report covers almost every aspect of the United 
States component of the International Association for the Evaluation 
of Educational Achievement's (IEA) International Reading Literacy 
Study, from the inception of the project to the production of the 
reports.  The report notes that since much has already been learned 
from studies such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress 
about the reading achievement of fourth and ninth graders, a primary 
objective in analyzing the data was to go beyond traditional 
approaches to the analysis and reporting of results.  The first part 
describes all aspects of the process by which data on students, 
teachers, and schools were collected.  The second part describes 
various aspects of the properties of the reading achievement 
instruments used, and an initial overview of the reading literacy 
skills of a few major subgroups.  The report culminates in the third 
part, which describes the methods used to analyze the data and the 
findings of these analyses.  Contains 146 tables and 67 figures of 
data.  Reading literacy tests and student, teacher, and school 
questionnaires are attached.  (RS)
  Descriptors: Data Analysis; Grade 4; Grade 9; Intermediate Grades; 
Junior High Schools; Literacy; *Reading Ability; *Reading Achievement; 
Reading Research; Research Methodology
  Identifiers: *International Evaluation Education Achievement; 
*United States


  
  EJ472580  EA528660
  Assessment of Student Achievement: National and International 
Perspectives.
  Levine, Daniel U.; Ornstein, Allan C.
  NASSP Bulletin, v77 n556 p46-59 Nov   1993
  ISSN: 0192-6365
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  International studies may be underestimating U.S. math and science 
performance in relation to other countries.  Such studies may be 
comparing U.S. students with more elite groups of students elsewhere.  
Lower performance may result from cultural differences and lower U.S. 
education expenditures.  Substantive improvement depends on increased 
planning time and staff development, reduced class sizes, and school 
reorganization.  (20 references) (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
Educational Trends; *International Cooperation; Secondary Education; 
*Student Evaluation; *Test Results
  Identifiers: *International Assessment of Educational Progress; 
*International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  EJ466300  TM517339
  Computers in Education: Some International Comparative Research 
Perspectives.
  Pelgrum, Willem J., Ed.; Plomp, Tjeerd, Ed.
  Studies in Educational Evaluation, v19 n2 p97-232   1993
  Theme issue.
  ISSN: 0191-491X
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: SERIAL (022);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL 
ARTICLE (080)
  Six articles analyze 1989 data from the Computers in Education 
Study of the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement (IEA), a cross-national elementary and 
secondary education assessment.  A seventh paper describes the 
rationale and procedures for construction of tests used in the 
study's second stage in 1992.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Administrator Role; *Comparative Analysis; Computer 
Literacy; *Computer Uses in Education; Cross Cultural Studies; 
*Educational Assessment; Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; Instructional Leadership; 
*International Studies; Principals; *Staff Development; Teacher 
Attitudes; *Test Construction
  Identifiers: *Computers in Education (IEA)


  
  ED372734  IR016671
  Schools, Teachers, Students and Computers: A Cross-National 
Perspective. IEA-Comped Study Stage 2.
  Pelgrum, W. J., Ed.; And Others
  1993
  238p.; For a related paper, see ED 337 157.
  ISBN: 92-9121-008-3
  Available From: University of Twente, Center for Applied 
Educational Research, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The 
Netherlands.
  Document Type: BOOK (010);  RESEARCH REPORT (143);  TEST, 
QUESTIONNAIRE (160)
  The Computers in Education (Comped) study was designed as a two-
stage survey.  The first stage (1987-1990) was aimed at gathering 
information from a representative sample of schools at elementary, 
lower secondary and upper secondary level with regard to the state of 
computer use in education.  The survey's focus was on the extent and 
availability of computers in schools, how computers are used, nature 
of instruction about computers, and the estimates of the effects that 
computers are having on students, curriculum, and the school as an 
institution.  This publication describes Stage 2. The first part of 
Stage 2 was a repetition of the survey of Stage 1, with data 
collection centering on a school questionnaire.  This enabled a 
longitudinal study of trends.  Part 2 of Stage 2 studied the 
relationship between policy, practice, and outcomes with respect to 
computers in education relating variables referring to school, 
teacher, and classroom practice to student variables such as 
functional computer literacy, specific knowledge about and 
experiences with computers, performance in handling computers as well 
as attitudes towards computers and their uses.  Ten countries 
(Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, India, Japan, Latvia, the 
Netherlands, Slovenia, and the United States) participated.  Because 
thorough analyses have not yet been done, the presentation is mostly 
descriptive.  The data collected are presented in 31 tables and 38 
figures.  Twelve appendixes, with an additional 30 tables, contain 
detailed information on participating countries, sampling, computer 
uses, and responses to specific questionnaire items.  (Contains 56 
references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis; *Comparative Education; 
*Computer Literacy; *Computer Uses in Education; *Cross Cultural 
Studies; Data Collection; Educational Policy; *Educational Practices; 
Educational Technology; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign 
Countries; Longitudinal Studies; Outcomes of Education; 
Questionnaires; Sampling; Sex Differences; Student Attitudes; Student 
Characteristics; Tables (Data); Teacher Characteristics
  Identifiers: Austria; Bulgaria; Computers in Education (IEA); 
Germany; Greece; India; International Assn Evaluation Educ 
Achievement; Japan; Latvia; Netherlands; Slovenia; United States


  
  ED358125  TM019904
  Improving Data Quality in IEA Studies: Looking Backward and 
Thinking Forward.
  Medrich, Elliott A.
  Apr 1993
  8p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council 
on Measurement in Education (Atlanta, GA, April 13-15, 1993).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Since studies conducted by the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) have had a dramatic 
impact on the way in which officials in the United States and the 
American public think about the performance of our students, it is 
essential that IEA surveys accurately measure real differences in 
student performance across comparable populations in participating 
countries.  Although data quality in past IEA studies has sometimes 
been problematic, the upcoming Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study (TIMSS) affords the opportunity to develop methods of 
data presentation that achieve reliable cross-national comparisons.  
Two issues in particular merit consideration.  The first issue is 
ensuring that field outcomes in participating countries are 
comparable and representative of a defined target population.  A 
second aspect concerns survey response rates.  It will also be 
necessary to determine how to deal with data when certain standards 
are not achieved.  One chart lists the number of participating 
systems in the various IEA studies.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Data Collection; Elementary Secondary Education; 
Foreign Countries; Futures (of Society); International Studies; 
National Surveys; Quality Control; Response Rates (Questionnaires); 
*Scores; *Test Results
  Identifiers: Educational Information; Evaluation Standards; 
*International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; Target Populations; 
*Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  EJ493906  SO525979
  What Does the United States Want to Learn from International 
Comparative Studies in Education?
  Griffith, Jeanne E.; Medrich, Elliott A.
  Prospects, v22 n4 p476-85   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Contends that, although surveys of international achievement have 
been of interest to the U.S. educational community, these studies are 
now receiving attention among policymakers.  Asserts that significant 
changes are occurring in world economy and that international 
achievement comparisons are receiving coverage in the U.S. media.  
(CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Adult Education; Curriculum 
Development; Educational Objectives; *Educational Research; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; Higher Education; 
International Education; *International Educational Exchange; 
Mathematics Instruction; Research Reports; *Research Utilization; 
Second Language Instruction; Teacher Education; *Theory Practice 
Relationship; Use Studies
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
National Center for Educational Statistics; *Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study

  
  EJ493905  SO525978
  How Japan Makes Use of International Educational Survey Research.
  Watanabe, Ryo
  Prospects, v22 n4 p455-62   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Discusses why Japan has participated in the international 
cooperative studies sponsored by the International Association for 
the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA).  Asserts that 
Japanese educators want to compare not only content acquisition but 
also measures of cognitive learning.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Computer Uses in Education; 
Curriculum Development; *Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; Higher Education; International 
Education; *International Educational Exchange; Research Reports; 
*Research Utilization; Science Instruction; *Teaching Methods; 
*Theory Practice Relationship; Thinking Skills; Use Studies
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Japan


  
  EJ488663  SO525612
  Analyzing Educational Outcomes Using International Data.
  Barrier, Emilie; Munck, Ingrid
  Prospects, v22 n3 p334-40   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Describes procedures needed to analyze large-scale databases.  
Presents two examples of how French educational researchers have 
utilized data from the International Association for the Evaluation 
of Educational Achievement (IEA) studies of mathematics and reading 
literacy.  Includes one table and three figures illustrating these 
techniques.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Curriculum Evaluation; *Data Analysis; Databases; 
Data Collection; *Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Foreign Countries; International Studies; Literacy; 
Mathematics; Mathematics Instruction; Research Methodology; Sex 
Differences
  Identifiers: *France; *International Assn Evaluation Educ 
Achievement; Sweden


  
  EJ488661  SO525610
  Data Management in Educational Survey Research.
  Schleicher, Andreas; Umar, Jahja
  Prospects, v22 n3 p317-25   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Asserts that educational policymakers must measure student 
achievement and school system performance accurately to help provide 
skills demanded by society.  Contends that many international surveys 
either fail to provide adequate and precise answers to the intended 
research questions or provide inaccurate and faulty results.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; Data Interpretation; *Educational Research; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; Government School 
Relationship; International Educational Exchange; *Research Design; 
Research Methodology; *Research Problems
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Survey Research


  
  EJ488660  SO525609
  Sample Design for International Studies of Educational Achievement.
  Ross, Kenneth N.
  Prospects, v22 n3 p305-16   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Contends that the high quality of the probability sampling used by 
the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA) is due, in large part, to procedures developed by 
IEA's first statistical consultant, Gilbert Peaker.  Concludes that 
the Peaker process is a first-class sample design.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; Data Interpretation; *Educational Research; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; *International 
Educational Exchange; *Research Design; Research Methodology; 
Research Problems
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Peaker (Gilbert); Zimbabwe


  
  EJ488658  SO525607
  Managing International Survey Research.
  Loxley, William
  Prospects, v22 n3 p289-96   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Discusses administrative policies related to projects of the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA).  Describes a typical budget for an IEA project.  
Includes a figure illustrating a typical project timetable.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Administration; *Educational 
Innovation; *Educational Research; Educational Researchers; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Financial Support; Higher Education; 
International Educational Exchange; International Organizations; 
Research and Development
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Survey Research


  
  EJ488657  SO525606
  Conceptualizing a Comparative Educational Research Framework.
  Plomp, Tjeerd
  Prospects, v22 n3 p278-88   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Presents reasons why nations should participate in international 
survey research.  Reviews the mission and history of the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA).  Discusses the design of a typical IEA study and 
includes five graphic figures and one table illustrating results of 
previous international surveys.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Innovation; *Educational Research; 
Educational Researchers; Elementary Secondary Education; Higher 
Education; *International Educational Exchange; International 
Organizations; *Research and Development
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  EJ458594  TM517024
  Profiles of Educational Systems of Countries Participating in 
Practical Skills Testing.
  Bathory, Zoltan; And Others
  Studies in Educational Evaluation, v18 n3 p301-18   1992
  Theme issue with title "Practical Skills Testing."
  ISSN: 0191-491X
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Information is presented about the educational systems of countries 
participating in the practical skills testing portions of the Second 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement Science Study, drawing on accounts submitted by the 
participant nations Hungary, Israel, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and the 
United States.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education; *Foreign Countries; 
Inservice Teacher Education; Laboratory Procedures; *National 
Programs; *Performance Tests; *Profiles; School Statistics; Science 
Curriculum; *Science Education; Science Equipment; Science Facilities; 
Science Tests; Skills; Student Evaluation; Teaching Methods
  Identifiers: Hungary; Israel; Japan; Korea; Performance Based 
Evaluation; *Practical Skills Testing; Science Achievement; Second 
International Science Study; Singapore; United States


  
  EJ458592  TM517022
  Procedures Used in Practical Skills Testing in Science.
  Tamir, Pinchas; And Others
  Studies in Educational Evaluation, v18 n3 p277-90   1992
  Theme issue with title "Practical Skills Testing."
  ISSN: 0191-491X
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  The development and administration of practical skills tests in 
science as part of the Second Science Study of the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement are 
described.  Scoring and sampling for Hungary, Israel, Japan, Korea, 
Singapore, and the United States are reviewed.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies; Educational Assessment; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; International 
Studies; Laboratory Procedures; *Performance Tests; *Research 
Methodology; Sampling; Science Education; *Science Tests; Scoring; 
Skills; Student Evaluation; Test Construction; *Test Use
  Identifiers: Hungary; Israel; Japan; Korea; Performance Based 
Evaluation; *Practical Skills Testing; Science Achievement; *Second 
International Science Study; Singapore; United States


  
  EJ458591  TM517021
  Practical Skills Testing in Science.
  Tamir, Pinchas; And Others
  Studies in Educational Evaluation, v18 n3 p263-75   1992
  Theme issue with title "Practical Skills Testing."
  ISSN: 0191-491X
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  REVIEW LITERATURE (070)
  In the mid-1980s, data were collected on international science 
achievement as part of the Second International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement Science Study.  The seven 
articles of this collection report on various facets of the practical 
skills testing of this study in which six countries participated.  
(SLD)
  Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies; Educational Assessment; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; *International 
Studies; Laboratory Procedures; *Performance Tests; *Research 
Methodology; Research Reports; Science Instruction; *Science Tests; 
*Skills; Student Evaluation
  Identifiers: Performance Based Evaluation; *Practical Skills 
Testing; Science Achievement; *Second International Science Study


  
  EJ445324  TM516481
  The Second International Science Study.
  Wolf, Richard M., Ed.
  International Journal of Educational Research, v17 n3-4 p227-397 
  1992
  ISSN: 0883-0355
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  SERIAL (022);  PROJECT 
DESCRIPTION (141)
  Twelve articles present excerpts from several national reports of 
countries participating on the Second International Science Study 
(SISS) of the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement.  The SISS examined science achievement and 
its correlates in participating countries and studied trends from 
1970 through the 1980s.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Affective Behavior; Educational 
Objectives; Elementary Secondary Education; *Foreign Countries; 
*International Studies; National Surveys; *Outcomes of Education; 
Predictor Variables; Questionnaires; Science Curriculum; *Science 
Education; Science Instruction; Science Tests
  Identifiers: Australia; Canada; China; Finland; Great Britain; 
Hungary; Israel; Netherlands; *Science Achievement; *Second 
International Science Study; Thailand; United States


  
  ED365515  SE053824
  Learning Science in a Changing World. Cross-National Studies of 
Science Achievement: 1970 to 1984.
  Keeves, J. P.
  1992
  70p.
  ISBN: 92-9121-001-3
  Available From: IEA International Headquarters, c/o S.V.O., 14 
Sweelinckplein, NL-2517 The Hague, The Netherlands.
  Document Type: BOOK (010);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  The world of education can be considered a natural laboratory in 
which different countries are experimenting with different strategies.  
This report presents the findings of the First and Second 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA) Science Studies.  The book contains the following 
chapters: (1) Issues in Science Education; (2) Introducing Science in 
the Primary School; (3) Science for All in the Middle Secondary 
School; (4) Graduating from High School; (5) Learning Science; (6) 
The Science Curriculum; (7) Teachers of Science and Their Influence; 
and (8) Planning Science Education for the Future.  (PR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Concept Formation; *Cross 
Cultural Studies; Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; 
*Science Curriculum; *Science Instruction; Science Teachers; Science 
Tests; Summative Evaluation; Teacher Characteristics; *Teacher 
Education
  Identifiers: First Science Assessment (1970); International Assn 
Evaluation Educ Achievement; Science Achievement; Second 
International Science Study


  
  ED357955  SE053128
  Technical Issues in the First and Second IEA Science Studies.
  Keeves, J. P.
  1992
  17p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 24, 1992).
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070)
  The first and second International Association for the Evaluation 
of Educational Achievement Science Studies examined and compared 
science achievement in 19 and 26 countries, respectively.  This paper 
considered 10 technical issues that arose in these 2 studies of 
science education and achievement.  The issues discussed were the: 
(1) need for the development of a theoretical framework for cross-
national studies of educational achievement; (2) need for national 
indicators of the conditions and outcomes of education; (3) 
difficulty of determining equivalent target populations in different 
countries; (4) difficulties related to longitudinal and cross-
sectional studies; (5) methods of analysis; (6) units and levels of 
analysis; (7) problems in scoring the tests and scaling the 
achievement test data; (8) sample design and execution; (9) problems 
involving sampling errors and significance testing; and (10) 
translation and national variations in instruments.  Appended 
information includes a list of 15 references; tables of sizes of 
achieved samples and response rates for the two studies; and 
schematic models of the context and components of the science 
curriculum, performance in science, and science achievement scale.  
(MDH)
  Descriptors: Comparative Education; *Cross Cultural Studies; Data 
Analysis; Data Collection; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign 
Countries; International Education; International Programs; Models; 
*Research Methodology; *Research Problems; *Science Education; 
Testing Programs; Test Results
  Identifiers: Educational Issues; First International Science Study; 
*International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; International 
Evaluation Education Achievement; International Studies on 
Educational Achievement; *Science Achievement; *Second International 
Science Study


  
  EJ439850  IR523958
  How Computers Are Used in United States Schools: Basic Data from 
the 1989 I.E.A. Computers in Education Survey.
  Becker, Henry Jay
  Journal of Educational Computing Research, v7 n4 p385-406 
  1991
  ISSN: 0735-6331
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Reports the results of the U.S. portion of a 1989 survey of 
elementary and secondary schools conducted by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) that 
focused on school and teacher practices in using microcomputers.  
Highlights include hardware, instructional uses, goals for computer 
use, and software utilization.  (three references) (LRW)
  Descriptors: *Computer Assisted Instruction; Courseware; 
Educational Objectives; Elementary Secondary Education; Learning 
Strategies; Longitudinal Studies; *Microcomputers; National Surveys; 
School Surveys; Tables (Data); Teacher Attitudes; *Use Studies
  Identifiers: Computer Selection; *International Assn Evaluation 
Educ Achievement


  
  EJ439838  IR523946
  Introduction of Computers in Education: State of the Art in Eight 
Countries.
  Plomp, Tjeerd; Pelgrum, Willem J.
  Computers and Education, v17 n3 p249-58   1991
  ISSN: 0360-1315
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Presents results of a survey of lower secondary schools in Belgium, 
France, Greece, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and 
the United States that addressed the availability and use of computer 
hardware and software.  Problems experienced in introducing computers 
into schools and the attitudes of principals toward computers are 
also examined.  (five references) (LRW)
  Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes; *Computer Assisted 
Instruction; Courseware; *Educational Trends; Foreign Countries; 
International Organizations; *Longitudinal Studies; Microcomputers; 
Principals; Problems; Questionnaires; School Surveys; Secondary 
Education; Tables (Data); *Use Studies
  Identifiers: Belgium; France; Greece; *International Assn 
Evaluation Educ Achievement; Japan; Luxembourg; Netherlands; 
Switzerland; United States


  
  EJ436663  SO522649
  Teaching Mathematics without a Coherent Point of View: Findings 
from the IEA Second International Mathematics Study.
  Sosniak, Lauren A.; And Others
  Journal of Curriculum Studies, v23 n2 p119-31 Mar-Apr 
  1991
  ISSN: 0022-0272
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  Discusses the results of a study of the teaching and learning of 
mathematics in 21 countries, conducted by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement.  Reports 
that a clear distinction between support for broad educational 
objectives and for the learning of narrow skills did not exist among 
teachers.  (SG)
  Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies; *Curriculum Development; 
*Curriculum Research; Educational Objectives; Elementary Education; 
*Grade 8; *Mathematics Instruction; Skill Development; *Teacher 
Attitudes
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  EJ434258  CS742537
  Covariance Structure Modeling: A Reanalysis of the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement's Reading 
Data.
  Clark, Sanza
  Journal of Clinical Reading: Research and Programs, v3 n3 p5-11 199
  1991
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Examines statistical models utilized in earlier studies and 
attempts to reanalyze the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) reading achievement data 
for England using a covariance structure model.  Shows that, with an 
appropriate model, school variables do significantly account for 
reading achievement scores, but their relative influence was greater 
than that of the home.  (MG)
  Descriptors: Analysis of Covariance; Data Analysis; Educational 
Research; Family Influence; Foreign Countries; *Reading Achievement; 
*Statistical Analysis
  Identifiers: Great Britain; *International Assn Evaluation Educ 
Achievement; *School Influence


  
  ED336722  CS010700
  IEA Reading Literacy Study--Policy Issues: National and 
International Perspectives.
  Williams, Trevor
  Apr 1991
  25p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (72nd, Chicago, IL, April 3-7, 
1991).
  Document Type: CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Mainly describing research methodology, this paper outlines an 
analysis and reporting strategy for the United States national 
analyses of reading literacy.  The first section of the paper is a 
brief description of the IEA Reading Literacy study and the issues it 
seeks to answer, along with an outline of three constraints which 
condition the development of an analysis and reporting strategy.  The 
second section raises issues about the specification of the audience 
for the findings of the study, and about the nature of the reporting 
most suitable for this audience.  The third section outlines the kind 
of theoretical/substantive decisions that must be made before 
analyses can begin, decisions about constructs and models, and 
presents the IEA Reading Literacy model.  The fourth section provides 
a discussion concerning the presentation of descriptive statistics 
from the study, and proposes a methodology for reporting multivariate 
statistics in a form acceptable to a general audience.  The fifth 
section outlines a reporting strategy designed to make the findings 
of the study accessible to a general audience.  The last section 
provides an outline of the structure and substance of the first 
United States national report.  (RS)
  Descriptors: Educational Research; Elementary Secondary Education; 
Higher Education; *Literacy; *National Surveys; *Reading Achievement; 
*Research Design; *Research Methodology; Student Evaluation
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*United States


  EJ450651  SE549968
  Mathematics Achievement of Boys and Girls: An International 
Perspective.
  Hanna, Gila
  Ontario Mathematics Gazette, v28 n3 p28-32 Apr   1990
  Journal availability: O.A.M.E., 1 Southdale Dr., Markham, ON L3P 
1J6, Canada.
  ISSN: 0030-3011
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Target Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
  A study analyzed data from the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement survey of 13 year olds from 20 
countries to examine gender differences in mathematics achievement.  
Multivariate analysis indicated differences varied from country to 
country and a significant difference in favor of boys in geometry 
achievement.  (MDH)
  Descriptors: Algebra; Arithmetic; Females; *Foreign Countries; 
Geometry; *Mathematics Achievement; Mathematics Education; 
Measurement; Multivariate Analysis; Secondary Education; *Secondary 
School Mathematics; *Sex Differences; Statistics; Surveys
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Mathematics Education Research


  
  EJ417313  SE546896
  Achievement Comparisons between the First and Second IEA Studies of 
Mathematics.
  Robitaille, David F.
  Educational Studies in Mathematics, v21 n5 p395-414 Oct 
  1990
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  Presented is a comparison of two major surveys of the teaching and 
learning of mathematics conducted by the International Association 
for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement.  Surveys indicate that 
performance levels have declined in computational skills and 
increased in algebra.  (Author/CW)
  Descriptors: *Algebra; Arithmetic; Calculus; *Comparative Education; 
*Computation; *Foreign Countries; Mathematics Achievement; 
Mathematics Education; Secondary Education; *Secondary School 
Mathematics; *Surveys
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED321757  IR014525
  IEA: Its Role and Plans for International Comparative Research in 
Education.
  Plomp, Tjeerd
  Apr 1990
  19p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April 16-20, 1990).
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  The International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA), an independent cooperative of research centers 
from about 45 countries, performs the type of research that provides 
data which can be used by policymakers as a basis for decision making 
about educational improvements.  This paper describes: (1) IEA's 
mission and history; (2) the design and structure of a typical IEA 
achievement study, using the Second International Mathematics Study 
as an illustration (including discussions of the conceptual framework 
on which the study is built, the process by which populations and 
samples are selected, and the development of achievement tests); (3) 
some exemplary results of IEA studies which compare total test scores 
internationally, illustrate the relationship between achievement and 
other variables, and analyze a national educational system; and (4) 
IEA's organization, relationship to other national and international 
organizations, and future plans.  Four recent IEA studies are cited 
and references are provided for forthcoming publications.  (24 
references) (GL)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; 
*Comparative Education; *Curriculum Evaluation; *Educational 
Improvement; Educational Research; Foreign Countries; *International 
Organizations; International Studies; *Policy Formation
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED318543  PS018714
  The International Perspective on Preprimary Education.
  Olmsted, Patricia P.; And Others
  Apr 1990
  13p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April 16-20, 1990).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Among nations throughout the world there is a need to share 
information about early childhood services.  This information would 
allow a given country to examine its early childhood services in 
light of the systems developed by other nations.  At present, 
comprehensive and detailed information about early childhood services 
in most countries around the world is not readily available in the 
United States.  As a major step in collecting the general information 
needed, a cross-national study of early childhood education and care 
services, the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement (IEA) Preprimary Project, is now being 
conducted.  The High/Scope Educational Research Foundation serves as 
the international coordinating center for the Preprimary Project.  In 
this report, a brief overview of the IEA Preprimary Project is 
followed by examples of data from official records and from families.  
Implications of the information for public policy and educational 
practices are discussed.  Preliminary findings from family survey 
data from the People's Republic of China and Portugal are discussed.  
It is concluded that as the United States plans for future early 
childhood programs, information from other countries should be used 
to allow a wider examination of the major issues and potential 
solutions to problems.  Such use may result in the most 
comprehensively based system of services possible for preprimary 
children.  (RH)
  Descriptors: *Cross Cultural Studies; Educational Practices; 
*Family Characteristics; Foreign Countries; Global Approach; 
*Intercultural Communication; *Preschool Education; *Public Policy; 
Research Needs
  Identifiers: China; High Scope Educational Research Foundation MI; 
*IEA Preprimary Project; Portugal; *Program Characteristics


  
  EJ370239  EA522165
  The NAEP and International Comparisons.
  Wolf, Richard M.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v69 n8 p580-82 Apr   1988
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Two assessment agencies, the National Assessment of Educational 
Progress (NAEP) in the U.S. and the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), provide the most 
promising framework for comparing U.S. education with education in 
other nations.  These agencies can cooperate to resolve technical 
issues and make data interpretation and international comparisons 
more meaningful.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Achievement Tests; Comparative Analysis; *Educational 
Cooperation; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
*International Organizations; Measurement; Professional Associations; 
Scores; *Test Construction; *Test Interpretation
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*National Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  EJ485417  RC510030
  The IEA Revisited.
  Harnqvist, Kjell
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p129-36 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Reviews noteworthy preliminary results from four current IEA 
research projects on science and mathematics education and 
achievement, classroom environment, and written composition.  
Summarizes the achievements of the IEA with regard to research 
instruments, research findings, policy impact, and the infrastructure 
of educational research.  (SV)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; International Cooperation; *Research Administration; 
Research Projects; Research Utilization
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  EJ485416  RC510029
  The Second International Science Study.
  Rosier, Malcolm J.
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p106-28 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Introduces the IEA's ongoing Second International Science Study, 
undertaken in 25 countries with students in approximately grades 5, 
9, and 12.  Discusses research goals; design; emphases on context of 
science education, curriculum comparisons, teaching practices, and 
outcomes (science achievement and student attitudes); target 
populations; sampling; instruments; and preliminary item results.  
Includes classification system for science curricula.  (SV)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Education; *Cross Cultural Studies; 
Curriculum Research; Elementary Secondary Education; *Research Design; 
*Science Education
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Science Achievement; *Second International Science Study


  
  EJ485414  RC510027
  The Classroom Environment Study: Teaching for Learning.
  Anderson, Lorin W.
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p69-87 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  The IEA's Classroom Environment Study, implemented in grades 5-9 in 
9 countries, examined effects on student outcomes of home, community, 
school, teacher, and student characteristics and classroom practices.  
Across countries, course content varied widely, but teachers relied 
on relatively few classroom behaviors.  Student learning was affected 
by student attitudes and prior learning; classroom practices had 
little effect.  (SV)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Classroom Environment; 
*Comparative Education; Context Effect; *Cross Cultural Studies; 
Intermediate Grades; Junior High Schools; *Student Attitudes; 
*Teacher Behavior; Teaching Methods
  Identifiers: *IEA Classroom Environment Study; International Assn 
Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  EJ485413  RC510026
  The Second IEA Mathematics Study.
  Garden, R. A.
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p47-68 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  The Second International Mathematics Study tested mathematics 
knowledge and skills among 13-year-olds and final-year secondary 
students in 17 countries.  Discusses population definitions; research 
administration; research design in relation to mathematics curricula; 
context variables (ethnic composition, language of instruction, 
tracking, rurality, school size, instructional time); and changes in 
national achievement levels since the first international study.  
(SV)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Education; Context Effect; *Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Grade 8; *Grade 12; *Mathematics Achievement; 
Mathematics Education; Outcomes of Education; Research Design; 
Secondary Education
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
International Surveys; *Second International Mathematics Study


  
  EJ485412  RC510025
  Policy Impact of IEA Research.
  Husen, Torsten
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p29-46 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Examines implications of IEA international educational research for 
educational policies in three areas: overall quality of the national 
educational system, including success in achieving social and 
economic objectives; structure of the formal system and its influence 
on student achievement; and influence of school resources and 
instructional methods on learning.  Discusses criticisms of the IEA's 
primarily quantitative methodology.  (SV)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Education; *Cross 
Cultural Studies; Educational Methods; Educational Objectives; 
*Educational Policy; *Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Equal Education; Research Problems; *Research Utilization
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Policy Implications


  
  EJ485411  RC510024
  The Evolution of the IEA: A Memoir.
  Purves, Alan C.
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p10-28 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  
JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Chronicles the "biography" of the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement: its emergence from a 
confederacy of research colleagues in the late 1950s to an "empire" 
to its present state as a collection of satrapies, each concerned 
with a particular research project.  Traces the development of 
various international research projects in comparative education.  
(SV)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
*Educational Research; International Cooperation; International 
Organizations; *Research Administration; Research Projects
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Organizational History


  
  EJ485410  RC510023
  Focus on the IEA. Introduction.
  Postlethwaite, T. Neville
  Comparative Education Review, v31 n1 p7-9 Feb   1987
  Special issue on the second IEA (International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement) study.
  ISSN: 0010-4086
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Briefly describes the organization and work of the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, including 
membership; international coordination; process of developing a 
research proposal; research funding; and new research projects on 
preprimary cognitive development, reading literacy, and computers in 
education.  (SV)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Education; *Coordination; *Educational 
Research; *International Cooperation; International Organizations; 
Research Administration; Research Projects
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED336267  SE052171
  The Second IEA Science Study--U.S. Revised Edition.
  Jacobson, Willard J.; And Others
  Sep 1987
  54p.; A Presentation at a Meeting of the General Assembly of the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (New York, NY, September 16, 1987).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  The Second IEA Science Study (SISS) was carried out in 1983 in 24 
countries.  In the United States a second phase of testing was 
undertaken in 1986.  This document describes the organization of the 
study in the United States and highlights some of the results and 
their possible implications for science education.  The countries 
included in the SISS are Australia, China, Canada, England, Finland, 
Ghana, Hong Kong, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea (Republic), 
The Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Papua-New Guinea, Philippines, 
Poland, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Tanzania, United States, and 
Zimbabwe.  Sections include (1) "Some Results from the Second IEA 
Science Study"; (2) "Science Education in the 1970s and 1980s: What 
Changes Have Taken Place?"; (3) "Sex and Science Achievement"; (4) 
"The Second IEA Science Study and Science Education in the United 
States"; and (5) "Comments and Reactions." (KR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Education; 
Educational Change; *Elementary School Science; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *Foreign Countries; International Cooperation; Science 
Education; *Secondary School Science; *Sex Differences


  
  ED294187  CS211170
  Time To Write: Report of the US-IEA Study of Written Composition.
  Baker, Eva L.
  Sep 1987
  30p.; Invited presentation at the IEA General Assembly (New York 
City, NY, September 1987). Project also partially supported by the 
MacArthur Foundation. For related documents, see ED 271 762 and ED 
286 194-195.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Examining the status of the United States National Study of the 
International Evaluation of Educational Achievement Study of Written 
Composition (IEA-SWC), this report discusses the results of SWC, 
which attempted to assess, nationally and internationally, the 
quality of student writing in schools by collecting and evaluating 
student compositions.  After a discussion on the nature of the 
writing process, the report presents a brief overview of SWC, noting 
its focus on sixth, tenth, and precollegiate twelfth grades, and 
describing the range of writing tasks and topics collected.  The 
report also examines challenges which confront the study, including 
fundamental doubts about the quality of writing assessment, the 
validity of comparative educational effects assessed through writing 
compositions, and topic selection control.  The report concludes that 
the US students' compositions met or exceeded the standard for 
minimally competent writing on major discourse tasks (narratives, 
persuasive essays, and reflective essays).  Four tables are included 
in the report, and 40 references are appended.  (MM)
  Descriptors: Academic Standards; Comparative Analysis; *Cross 
Cultural Studies; Grade 6; Grade 10; Grade 12; Instructional 
Effectiveness; Secondary Education; *Writing (Composition); *Writing 
Evaluation; Writing Research
  Identifiers: *IEA Study of Written Composition; *International Assn 
Evaluation Educ Achievement


  
  ED299314  TM012204
  Comparison of the Achievement of American Elementary and Secondary 
Pupils with Those Abroad--The Examinations Sponsored by the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA).
  Riddle, Wayne
  30 Jun 1986
  42p.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Available sources of information on academic achievement levels of 
American elementary and secondary school students as compared to 
their counterparts in major foreign countries are analyzed.  Focus is 
on testing conducted by the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) in Stockholm (Sweden).  
The IEA tests represent an attempt to: (1) develop comparable tests 
reflecting both international standards and national curricula; (2) 
assess representative samples of students in voluntarily 
participating countries; and (3) analyze the resulting scores in 
relation to additional information concerning students' background 
characteristics and attitudes.  Findings from current major 
international assessments of mathematics and science achievement are 
reviewed, and possible reasons for the sometimes comparatively lower 
level of performance by American students in such examinations are 
analyzed.  The testing process established by the IEA is described, 
and results for the first round of IEA testing are interpreted, with 
an emphasis on American students' scores.  Available IEA second round 
results are also assessed.  The appendix reviews significant, recent, 
non-IEA research on comparative achievement of American students in 
relation to students of other major counties, namely Japan.  Nine 
data tables are provided.  (TJH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; Cross 
Cultural Studies; Elementary School Students; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *Foreign Countries; Mathematics Achievement; *Mathematics 
Tests; *Science Tests; Secondary School Students; Testing Programs; 
*Test Interpretation
  Identifiers: Between Group Differences; Cross Cultural Testing; 
*International Evaluation Education Achievement


  
  ED279707  TM870094
  NAEP and International Comparisons.
  Wolf, Richard M.
  1986
  20p.; One of 46 papers commissioned by the Study Group on the 
National Assessment of Student Achievement and cited in Appendix B to 
their final report "The Nation's Report Card" (TM 870 049). For other 
papers in this group, see TM 870 050-093.
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120)
  This paper examines a number of issues surrounding the addition of 
a dimension of international comparisons to the National Assessment 
of Educational Progress (NAEP).  The basic position of the paper is 
that adding an international dimension to NAEP is certainly possible, 
but some problems will need to be overcome.  Non-issues are 
identified and eliminated, including: (1) the organization of United 
States participation in the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); and (2) response rates 
in IEA studies.  Issues to be considered fall into three major 
categories: (1) financial and political, (2) technical, and (3) 
interpretation.  Financial and political problems center around 
control and support for IEA projects.  Another political problem 
relates to an IEA policy of not releasing any nation's data to 
another nation until an international report has been released.  
Technical issues include age and grade levels for testing, test 
construction, testing conditions, test organization, time of testing, 
and schedules of studies.  When comparing nations, the results will 
need to be intepreted carefully.  An appendix contains background 
materials about IEA.  (LMO)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Testing; *Cross Cultural Studies; 
*Educational Assessment; Educational Policy; Educational Testing; 
Elementary Secondary Education; *Evaluation Needs; Financial Support; 
*International Cooperation; International Programs; National Surveys; 
Testing Problems; Testing Programs; Test Interpretation
  Identifiers: *International Evaluation Education Achievement; 
*National Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  EJ311756  EA518511
  The Second International Science Study: U.S. Results.
  Jacobson, Willard J.; Doran, Rodney L.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v66 n6 p414-17 Feb   1985
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Target Audience: Policymakers
  Fifth and ninth graders in United States schools scored 
significantly higher in the Second International Science Study than 
did their counterparts in the first study conducted in 1970.  
Differences between the responses of males and females in 1983 were 
also noteworthy, especially at the 12th-grade level.  (PGD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Achievement Gains; Comparative 
Education; Elementary Secondary Education; National Surveys; Outcomes 
of Education; *Science Education; Science Tests; Sex Differences
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*Science Achievement; *Second International Science Study


  
  EJ311755  EA518510
  Mathematics Achievement in U.S. Schools: Preliminary Findings from 
the Second IEA Mathematics Study.
  Travers, Kenneth J.; McKnight, Curtis C.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v66 n6 p407-13 Feb   1985
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  The Second International Mathematics Study conducted by the 
International Association for the Evalaution of Educational 
Achievement examined mathematics teaching and its outcomes at the 8th-
 and 12th-grade levels in the United States and 21 other countries.  
This article reports on preliminary U.S. findings and their 
implications.  (PGD)
  Descriptors: Comparative Education; *Mathematics Achievement; 
*Mathematics Curriculum; Mathematics Education; *National Surveys; 
Outcomes of Education; Secondary Education; Secondary School 
Mathematics
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Multinational Studies; *Second International Mathematics Study


  
  EJ311754  EA518509
  International Comparisons of Cognitive Achievement.
  Coleman, James S.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v66 n6 p403-06 Feb   1985
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  POSITION PAPER (120);  
EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Target Audience: Researchers
  Data gathered by the International Association for the Evaluation 
of Educational Achievement (IEA) can be used to analyze the relative 
effects of educational systems in different countries.  A simplified 
example of such analysis utilizes variations among countries, among 
age cohorts within countries, and between subject matter competencies 
within cohorts.  (PGD)
  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis; *Comparative Education; 
Educational Assessment; Educational Development; Educational Research; 
Evaluation Criteria; Foreign Countries; National Programs; National 
Surveys; *Outcomes of Education
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Multinational Studies


  
  EJ302257  CE514641
  The I.E.A. National Case Study.
  Passow, A. Harry
  Educational Forum, v48 n4 p469-87 Sum   1984
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120)
  Discusses the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement (I.E.A.) and its use of the National Case 
Study Questionnaire (NCSQ) in connection with six subject studies.  
The purpose of the NCSQ was (1) to identify factors that account for 
the differences among educational systems and (2) to relate these 
factors to the cognitive outcomes of learning.  (JOW)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; 
Educational Planning; *International Studies; *Outcomes of Education; 
*Program Evaluation; Questionnaires
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
National Case Study Questionnaire


  
  ED227077  SP021853
  Time, Content and Expectations as Predictors of School Achievement 
in the USA and Other Developed Countries: A Review of IEA Evidence.
  Holsinger, Donald B.
  28 Sep 1982
  58p.; Paper presented at a Meeting of the National Commission on 
Excellence in Education (New York, NY, September 28, 1982).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  An overview is presented of the scope and findings of the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA) studies, which analyzed student achievement in 22 
nations, one of which was the United States.  Using these findings, 
this paper identifies national differences in the performance of 
pupils representing the United States and other nations which are 
part of a set of relatively more developed countries.  Three 
principal considerations in the differences found--time spent on the 
subject, curriculum content, and student, teacher, and family 
expectations--are discussed, along with the principal findings: (1) 
Among more advanced countries and students, there were no marked 
deviations in the pattern of achievement test scores; (2) Time given 
to instruction and opportunity to learn were two key characteristics 
associated with high test scores and achievement; (3) Curriculum 
content was consistently and significantly related to achievement 
scores in the less developed countries and to only a slightly smaller 
degree in the more developed countries; and (4) Inferences with 
respect to the place of expectations in student achievement were 
largely limited to personal expectations and motivation of the 
individual student.  (JD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Course 
Content; *Curriculum Design; *Developed Nations; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Expectation; Family Characteristics; Family Influence; 
*Foreign Countries; Second Language Instruction; Sex Differences; 
Student Motivation; Student Teacher Relationship; *Time Factors 
(Learning); Time on Task
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*National Commission on Excellence in Education

  
  ED225992  SP021799
  A Cross-National Perspective on Assessing the Quality of Learning.
  Husen, Torsten
  Feb 1982
  56p.; Paper presented at a Meeting of the National Commission on 
Excellence in Education (Washington, DC, February 1982).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  A ten-year research effort, conducted by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), 
explored the relative merits and failings of different national 
systems of education in the United States and in Western and Eastern 
Europe.  The first section of this report deals with trends in 
American education as seen through European eyes.  The American 
system is viewed as a vehicle for upward social mobility and as a 
means of solving or ameliorating social problems.  In the second 
section, the theoretical framework and research strategy of the IEA 
are described, as well as the difficulties encountered in comparing 
systems of education that are widely different in function and 
philosophy.  The way individual differences are perceived and taken 
into account in organizing formal education in various national 
systems is considered in the third section.  Comparisons are made of 
the American model of comprehensive education for all students, the 
Western European model, with early transfer of selected elite 
students to academic secondary schools, and the Soviet unitary school 
that integrates all types of schools.  The fourth section elaborates 
on comparisons between comprehensive and selective systems of 
education.  An analysis is made of performance differences in 
mathematics and science students in divergent systems.  An overall 
conclusion is reached that the American comprehensive system more 
effectively serves all of the talent of a nation.  (JD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Academic Aptitude; Comparative 
Analysis; Comparative Education; Delivery Systems; *Developed Nations; 
Educational Change; *Educational Policy; *Educational Practices; 
*Educational Quality; Educational Trends; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Equal Education; *Foreign Countries; Higher Education; 
Individual Differences; Outcomes of Education; Social Attitudes
  Identifiers: Europe; International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*National Commission on Excellence in Education; United States

[Table of Contents]

ERIC Documents Citations for Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)

  
  EJ542625  EA533287
  More on TIMSS.
  Bracey, Gerald W.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v78 n8 p656-57 Apr   1997
  ISSN: 0031-7217
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Singapore students scored highest on the Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study.  Any nation that "outsources" its 
poverty (Malaysian street sweepers) and its low-achievers (who study 
in Malaysia) can get high test scores.  U.S./Japan score differences 
stem from Japan's effective teaching practices.  Among 13 occupations 
in the 1992 Adult Literacy Study, teachers score in the middle.  
(MLH)
  Descriptors: Adult Literacy; Comparative Education; *Cultural 
Differences; *Educational Practices; Elementary Secondary Education; 
Foreign Countries; *Mathematics Achievement; Research Problems; 
Scores; *Test Results
  Identifiers: Singapore; *Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study


  
  EJ537575  EA532989
  Many Visions, Many Aims, One Test.
  Bracey, Gerald W.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v78 n5 p411-12 Jan   1997
  ISSN: 0031-7217
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  According to newly released Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study data, American children may score low on international 
comparisons because teachers are trying to teach them too many topics.  
Surprisingly, Florida's minimum competency testing program has not 
increased low-achievers' dropout rate.  A recent "American 
Demographics" article shows 40% of adults engaged in formal 
educational activities.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Adult Education; *Comparative Education; *Dropout 
Rate; Educational Technology; Educational Trends; Education Work 
Relationship; *Mathematics Achievement; *Minimum Competency Testing; 
Postsecondary Education; Research Problems; Secondary Education; Test 
Results
  Identifiers: Curriculum Management; Florida; *Science Achievement; 
Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  EJ536410  PS525967
  From the Desk of the Secretary of Education. TIMSS Benchmarks.
  Riley, Richard W.
  Teaching Pre K-8, v27 n4 p6 Jan   1997
  ISSN: 0891-4508
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  POSITION PAPER (120);  
JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Describes findings of the Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study (TIMSS), on which eighth-grade U.S. scores were above 
average in science and below average in mathematics.  Concludes that 
teachers are vital to raising standards by analyzing teaching 
practices, reforming professional development programs, 
implementating new teaching strategies, and increasing expectations.  
(SD)
  Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Competence; Educational 
Improvement; Elementary Education; Grade 8; Junior High Schools; 
Knowledge Level; *Mathematics Achievement; Mathematics Education; 
Mathematics Tests; Middle Schools; Science Education; *Science Tests; 
Teacher Effectiveness; Teacher Expectations of Students; Teacher 
Influence; *Teacher Role; *Test Results
  Identifiers: *Benchmark Tests; Department of Education; Middle 
School Students; *Third International Mathematics and Science Study; 
United States


  
  ED406419  TM026341
  Mathematics Achievement in the Middle School Years. IEA's Third 
International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).
  Beaton, Albert E.; And Others
  1996
  243p.; Funding for the international coordination of the Third 
International Mathematics Study is provided by the U.S. National 
Center for Education Statistics, the U.S. National Science 
Foundation, the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement, and the Canadian government.
  ISBN: 1-889938-02-5
  Available From: Boston College, Center for the Study of Testing, 
Evaluation, and Educational Policy, Campion Hall 323, Chestnut Hill, 
MA 02167; ($30--international customers add $7.50 for postage); 
http://wwwcsteep.bc.edu/timss
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110); 
 COLLECTION (020)
  The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is 
the largest and most ambitious study undertaken by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement.  Forty-
five countries collected data in more than 30 languages.  Five grade 
levels were tested in the two subject areas, so that more than half a 
million students were tested around the world.  This report addresses 
middle-school mathematics achievement (grades seven and eight) in six 
content areas: (1) fractions and number sense; (2) measurement; (3) 
proportionality; (4) data representation, analysis, and probability; 
(5) geometry; and (6) algebra.  Results cover 41 countries with 
complete data collection.  Singapore was the top-performing country 
at both grade levels, with Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong also 
performing very well.  There were large differences in average 
achievement between top performers and bottom performing nations.  
Gender differences in mathematics achievement were small or nearly 
nonexistent in most countries, but when they did appear, they favored 
boys.  In nearly every country there was a strong positive 
relationship between student enjoyment of mathematics and higher 
achievement.  Home factors were strongly related to mathematics 
achievement in every participating country, but relationships between 
instructional variables and achievement were less clear.  In every 
country, the pattern was for the eighth grade student whose parents 
had more education to also have higher achievement in mathematics.  
The amount of television viewing was negatively associated with 
mathematics achievement.  The document's introduction provides 
information on each country's characteristics including demographics, 
public expenditures on education, organization of educational system.  
Chapters address: (1) International Student Achievement in 
Mathematics; (2) Average Achievement; (3) Performance on Items within 
Each Mathematics Content Area; (4) Students Backgrounds and Attitudes 
towards Mathematics; and (5) Teachers and Instruction.  Appendixes 
include: Overview of TIMSS Procedures; Test-Curriculum Matching 
Analysis; Selected Mathematics Achievement Eighth-Grade Results for 
the Philippines, Denmark, Sweden, and German-Speaking Switzerland; 
and Percentiles and Standard Deviations of Mathematics Achievement.  
(SLD)
  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis; Data Collection; Family 
Environment; Foreign Countries; Grade 7; Grade 8; International 
Education; *International Studies; Junior High Schools; *Mathematics 
Achievement; Mathematics Tests; *Middle Schools; Performance Factors; 
Questionnaires; Reliability; Research Methodology; Sampling; Scoring; 
Sex Differences; Tables (Data); Test Construction; *Test Results; 
Translation
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; Middle 
School Students; *Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  ED406418  TM026340
  Third International Mathematics and Science Study. Technical 
Report. Volume I: Design and Development.
  Martin, Michael O., Ed.; Kelly, Dana L., Ed.
  1996
  270p.; Funding for the international coordination of the Third 
International Mathematics Study is provided by the National Center 
for Education Statistics, the National Science Foundation, the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement, and the Canadian government.
  ISBN: 1-889938-00-9
  Available From: Boston College, Center for the Study of Testing, 
Evaluation, and Educational Policy, Campion Hall 323, Chestnut Hill, 
MA 02167; http://wwwcsteep.bc.edu/timss
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  
STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110)
  The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 
developed and administered tests and questionnaires in three student 
populations to document the quality of mathematics and science 
education in 45 participating countries.  Study design, instrument 
development, and research procedures were achieved through a complex 
collaborative process.  This volume of the technical report focuses 
on study design and development.  Each chapter addresses a critical 
issue in development.  Documentation of TIMSS implementation and 
analytic procedures will be presented in a future volume.  Chapters 
are: (1) "Third International Mathematics and Science Study: An 
Overview" (Michael O. Martin); (2) "Development of the TIMSS 
Achievement Tests" (Robert A. Garden and Graham Orpwood); (3) "The 
TIMSS Test Design" (Raymond J. Adams and Eugenio J. Gonzalez); (4) 
"Sample Design" (Pierre Foy, Keith Rust, and Andreas Schleicher); (5) 
"Development of the TIMSS Context Questionnaires" (William H. Schmidt 
and Leland Cogan); (6) "Development and Design of the TIMSS 
Performance Assessment" (Maryellen Harmon and Dana L. Kelly); (7) 
"Scoring Techniques and Criteria" (Svein Lie, Alan Taylor, and 
Maryellen Harmon); (8) "Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the 
Survey Instruments" (Beverley Maxwell); (9) "Field Operations" 
(Andreas Schleicher and Maria Teresa Siniscalco); (10) "Training 
Sessions for Free-Response Scoring and Administration of Performance 
Assessment" (Ina V. S. Mullis, Chancey Jones, and Robert A. Garden); 
and (11) "Quality Assurance Procedures" (Michael O. Martin, Ina V. S. 
Mullis, and Dana L. Kelly).  Three appendixes present 
acknowledgments, TIMSS test blueprints, and survey operations forms.  
(Contains 13 figures, 71 tables, and 8 appendix tables.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; Data 
Collection; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
International Education; *International Studies; *Mathematics Tests; 
Quality Control; Questionnaires; Reliability; *Research Design; 
Research Methodology; Sampling; *Science Tests; Scoring; Tables 
(Data); *Test Construction; Testing; Translation
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Monitoring; *Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  ED406417  TM026339
  Third International Mathematics and Science Study: Quality 
Assurance in Data Collection.
  Martin, Michael O., Ed.; Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.
  1996
  286p.; Funding for the international coordination of the Third 
International Mathematics Study is provided by the National Center 
for Education Statistics, the National Science Foundation, the 
International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement, and the Canadian government.
  ISBN: 1-889938-01-7
  Available From: Boston College, Center for the Study of Testing, 
Evaluation, and Educational Policy, Campion Hall 323, Chestnut Hill, 
MA 02167; http://wwwcsteep.bc.edu/timss
  Document Type: COLLECTION (020);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  
STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110)
  The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is 
the most ambitious study conducted by the International Association 
for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement to date.  TIMSS 
developed and administered tests and questionnaires in three student 
populations to study achievement in participating countries and the 
factors associated with high achievement.  Contributions to this 
volume describe the main elements of the effort to assure the quality 
of TIMSS data, focusing on such issues as the translation of the 
achievement tests from English into the 30 other languages of the 
study, sampling from the 45 participating countries, and reliability 
questions.  The following chapters are included: (1) "Translation, 
Verification" (Ina V. S. Mullis, Dana L. Kelly, and Kathleen Haley); 
(2) "Sampling" (Pierre Foy, Michael O. Martin, and Dana L. Kelly); 
(3) "Monitoring the TIMSS Data Collection" (Michael O. Martin, Craig 
D. Hoyle, and Kelvin D. Gregory); (4) "Observing the TIMSS Test 
Administration" (Michael O. Martin, Craig D. Hoyle, and Kelvin D. 
Gregory); (5) "Quality Control Steps for Free-Response Scoring" (Ina 
V. S. Mullis and Teresa A. Smith); and (6) "Data Consistency Checking 
across Countries" (Heiko Jungclaus and Michael Bruneforth).  Nine 
appendixes present supplemental information about study methodology.  
(Contains 1 figure, 28 tables, and 3 appendix tables.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; *Data 
Collection; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
International Education; *International Studies; *Mathematics Tests; 
*Quality Control; Questionnaires; Reliability; Research Methodology; 
Sampling; *Science Tests; Scoring; Tables (Data); Testing; 
Translation
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Monitoring; *Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  ED404174  SE059714
  Maths and Science on the Line: Australian Junior Secondary 
Students' Performance in the Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study. TIMSS Australia Monograph No. 1.
  Lokan, Jan; And Others
  1996
  237p.
  ISBN: 0-86431-233-4
  Available From: Australian Council for Educational Research Ltd., 
19 Prospect Hill Road, Camberwell, Melbourne, Victoria, 3124, 
Australia.
  Document Not Available from EDRS.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  BOOK (010)
  The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is 
the largest, most comprehensive, comparative study of mathematics and 
science education with more than half a million student participants 
from three stages of their schooling in 45 different countries.  This 
monograph is the first in a series of three which will report on 
TIMSS in Australia, one for each of these populations.  It contains a 
description of the procedures used and results obtained from the 
study of Population 2, which included the two adjacent grade levels 
containing the largest proportion of 13-year-old students at the time 
of testing.  Chapter 1 provides the background for the study while 
chapters 2 and 3 contain international and national results on the 
achievement tests, presented together with a discussion of important 
student characteristics.  These are followed by chapters presenting 
some sample mathematics and science test items, an indication of the 
item difficulty levels, where they fit in terms of the curriculum 
profiles for Australian schools, and a discussion of performance in 
content area categories within mathematics and science.  The 
performance assessment components of TIMSS is featured in chapter 6 
followed by a discussion and some results of the international and 
national curriculum analyses in chapter 7. Chapters 8, 9, and 10 
provide a description of the Australian schools, teachers, and 
students who participated in TIMSS and examine several factors in 
relation to student achievement.  The final chapter raises some 
questions for Australian educational policy agendas based on the 
TIMSS results.  Appendices contain statistical tables, item 
difficulty maps, publications used for document analysis, and a 
bibliography.  (JRH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Foreign 
Countries; *Global Approach; *Mathematics Education; *Science 
Education; Secondary Education
  Identifiers: Australia; Third International Mathematics and Science 
Study


  
  ED402188  SE059471
  Achievements of Secondary 1 and Secondary 2 Pupils in Mathematics 
and Science: Third International Mathematics and Science Study 
(TIMSS).
  1996
  32p.
  ISBN: 0-7480-5808-7
  Available From: Scottish Council for Research in Education, 15 St. 
John Street, Edinburgh EH8 8JR, Scotland.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  This Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), 
carried out in 1995, collected information about pupils' knowledge 
and understanding of mathematics and science, mathematics and science 
curricula, and teaching and learning practices.  Data collection 
instruments included tests in mathematics and science and 
questionnaires completed by schools, teachers, and pupils.  This 
report summarizes the TIMSS results for secondary 1 and secondary 2 
pupils (mostly 13-year-olds) in Scotland.  Results are reported in 
two sections: mathematics and science.  Each section includes 
performance, examples of test items, and Scottish features and 
international comparisons.  Conclusions drawn include: Scotland's 
performance relative to the other TIMSS countries was poor, 
especially in mathematics; of the Pacific rim countries Singapore, 
Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong did very well in mathematics, but the 
performance of Thailand was poorer; the gain in performance between 
secondary 1 and secondary 2 was quite large in Scotland in both 
mathematics and science, and Scottish pupils' performance was better 
on certain aspects of mathematics and science; in almost all 
countries boys did better than girls in science and the difference 
was significant; pupils experienced more mathematics teaching on 
average in Scotland but less than average in science; and more pupils 
were absent on a typical day in Scotland than in any other country.  
(JRH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Educational Strategies; 
Foreign Countries; Global Approach; Homework; *Mathematics Education; 
*Science Education; Secondary Education; Sex Differences
  Identifiers: Scotland; *Third International Mathematics and Science 
Study


  
  ED401126  SE059190
  Mathematics and Science Education around the World: What Can We 
Learn from the Survey of Mathematics and Science Opportunities (SMSO) 
and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)?
  1996
  32p.; For the information booklet on the Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study, see SE 059 191.
  ISBN: 0-309-05631-4
  Available From: National Research Council, Mathematical Sciences 
Education Board or Committee on Science Education K-12, 2101 
Constitution Avenue N.W., HA 450, Washington, DC 20418.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  This report is designed to help frame discussion and analysis of 
data that will emerge from the Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study (TIMSS), a landmark study of mathematics and science 
education that investigates the mathematics and science curricula at 
three academic levels--age 9, age 13, and the last year of high 
school--in more than 40 countries.  The primary source for this 
report is the first released component of TIMSS, the Survey of 
Mathematics and Science Opportunities (SMSO).  It also draws on 
related published documents and on informal consultation with TIMSS 
staff and highlights directions for further inquiry more than 
findings.  The focus of this report is on what TIMSS will be able to 
contribute to the understanding of mathematics and science education 
around the world as well as to current efforts to improve student 
learning, particularly in the United States.  Topics covered include 
information on TIMSS, opportunity to learn, kinds of information 
collected by TIMSS researchers, challenges and opportunities of cross-
national research, information on SMSO, what can be learned from 
SMSO, intended curriculum, implemented curriculum and instructional 
practices, and further questions that might be explored by TIMSS.  It 
is concluded that SMSO and TIMSS offer an important opportunity to 
learn more about international variations in curriculum and 
instructional practice in mathematics and science, and this data 
provides a rare opportunity in discourse about mathematics and 
science education, its analysis, and improvement.  (JRH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Comparative Analysis; 
Educational Change; Educational Strategies; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Global Approach; International Studies; *Mathematics 
Education; *Science Education
  Identifiers: *International Surveys; *Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


  ED400209  SE059634
  Pursuing Excellence: A Study of U.S. Eighth-Grade Mathematics and 
Science Teaching, Learning, Curriculum, and Achievement in 
International Context. Initial Findings from the Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study.
  Peak, Lois; And Others
  Nov 1996
  82p.
  Available From: World-Wide Web: http://www.ed.gov/NCES/timss
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is 
the largest, most comprehensive, and most rigorous international 
comparison of education ever undertaken.  During the 1995 school 
year, the study tested the mathematics and science knowledge of a 
half-million students from 41 nations at five different grade levels.  
In addition to tests and questionnaires, the TIMSS included a 
curriculum analysis, videotaped observations of mathematics 
classrooms, and case studies of policy issues.  This report on eighth-
grade students is one of a series of reports that will also present 
findings on student achievement at fourth-grade level, at the end of 
high school, as well as on various other topics.  The report combines 
the major findings from each of the five parts of the study into a 
single story about U.S. eighth-grade mathematics and science 
achievement in a comparative perspective.  Chapter 1 draws from the 
results of the student assessments to describe how U.S. students 
perform in mathematics and science.  Succeeding chapters focus on 
factors which may have an important influence on achievement, and 
describe how our nation's schools, teachers, and students compare to 
those in other countries.  Chapter 2 examines educational standards 
and the curriculum, based on data from the curriculum analysis, case 
studies, videotape study, and questionnaires.  Chapter 3 focuses on 
how teachers actually teach the curriculum, drawing from results of 
the videotape study and questionnaires.  Chapter 4 examines the 
working life of teachers, based on findings from the case studies and 
questionnaires.  Chapter 5 describes the lives of students, both in 
and out of school, based upon case study and questionnaire data.  The 
conclusions at the end of the report look across all of the findings 
for insights about factors associated with student performance and 
indicate questions for further study.  (JRH)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Case Studies; *Comparative 
Analysis; Educational Strategies; *Global Approach; *Grade 8; Junior 
High Schools; Mathematics Curriculum; *Mathematics Education; 
Mathematics Teachers; Observation; Questionnaires; Science Curriculum; 
*Science Education; Science Teachers; Teaching Methods
  Identifiers: *Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  EJ517148  TM519230
  Surveying Educational Opportunity in Mathematics and Science: An 
International Perspective.
  Schmidt, William H.; McKnight, Curtis C.
  Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, v17 n3 p337-53 Fall 
  1995
  Versions of articles in this issue were presented at a special 
symposium entitled "Sleepless in Woodland Hills: The Leigh Burstein 
Legacy" at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research 
Association (San Francisco, CA, April 18-22, 1995).
  ISSN: 0162-3737
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150);  
JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  This article focuses on educational opportunity as an organizing 
construct of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study 
(TIMSS), in contrast with traditional opportunity-to-learn measures.  
A new conceptualization of educational opportunity is needed for 
cross-national studies.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Access to Education; Cross Cultural Studies; 
Elementary Secondary Education; *Equal Education; Evaluation Methods; 
*International Studies; *Mathematics; *Measurement Techniques; 
*Science Education
  Identifiers: Educational Indicators; *Opportunity to Learn; *Third 
International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  ED385057  EC304090
  A Perspective on Education and Assessment in Other Nations: Where 
Are Students with Disabilities? Synthesis Report 19.
  Elliott, Judy L.; And Others
  Apr 1995
  58p.
  Available From: NCEO, 350 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Rd., 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($15).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  This report reviews five major international comparative studies on 
educational practices, assessment systems, and educational outcomes 
for students with disabilities.  The five studies reviewed are: (1) 
the Reading Literacy Survey conducted by the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); (2) 
the International Assessment of Educational Progress of the 
Educational Testing Service; (3) the Third International Mathematics 
and Science Study; (4) the International Education Indicators Project 
of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development; and 
(5) the Computers in Education Study to be conducted by the IEA.  The 
report notes differences in sampling procedures and the extent to 
which students with disabilities participate in the assessments.  The 
report also reviews the educational and assessment systems of 14 
countries, focusing on the participation of students with 
disabilities.  Educational assessment systems in the following 
countries are described: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, China, 
England and Wales, France, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Nigeria, 
Sweden, Tunisia, and the United States.  Each country description 
includes information on the general education system, including age 
of entry and duration of schooling, educational policies and 
procedures for students with disabilities, how decisions are made 
about placements, assessment practices, and the reporting of 
assessment results.  (Contains 86 references.) (DB)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; 
Decision Making; *Disabilities; *Educational Assessment; Educational 
Practices; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
International Studies; *Outcomes of Education; Sampling; Special 
Education; *Student Evaluation; Student Participation; Student 
Placement
  Identifiers: Computers in Education (IEA); International Assessment 
of Educational Progress; International Educational Indicators; 
*International Surveys; Reading Literacy Survey; Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


  
  EJ500243  SE553825
  The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).
  Harris, Sue
  Mathematics in School, v23 n5 p34-35 Nov   1994
  ISSN: 0305-7259
  Document Type: NON-CLASSROOM MATERIAL (055);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Discusses the Third International Mathematics and Science Study 
including schools' involvement, international dimensions, tests' 
content, and value of TIMSS.  (MKR)
  Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education; *International Studies; 
Mathematics Education; *Mathematics Tests; Science Education; 
*Science Tests
  Identifiers: England; *Third International Mathematics and Science 
Study


  
  ED380274  SE055660
  Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and Science. TIMSS Monograph 
No. 1.
  Robitaille, David F., Ed.; And Others
  1993
  102p.
  ISBN: 0-88865-090-6
  Available From: Pacific Educational Press, Faculty of Education, 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, 
Canada.
  Document Type: BOOK (010);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Target Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
  The development of curriculum frameworks for mathematics and 
science was an essential first step in the Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).  The frameworks have served as 
guides for the design of the achievement testing component of TIMSS, 
and as the foundation upon which the curriculum analysis component of 
the study is based.  The goal of this monograph is to explicate those 
frameworks, to trace the process of their development as part of the 
overall TIMSS project, and to show where the frameworks and the 
curriculum analysis fit into the study as a whole.  Chapter 1 is an 
introduction to TIMSS, and chapter 2 contains an overview of the 
study as a whole, as well as a description of the conceptual 
framework and related research questions.  Chapter 3 includes a 
description of the structure of the frameworks and presents some 
suggestions about ways in which the frameworks might be used to 
provide rich descriptions of student outcome data.  The frameworks 
themselves are presented in the appendices.  Contains 34 references.  
(MKR)
  Descriptors: Achievement Tests; Elementary Secondary Education; 
Foreign Countries; *International Studies; *Mathematics Education; 
*Mathematics Tests; Research Design; Science Education; *Science 
Tests
  Identifiers: Science Education Research; *Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


  
  ED358125  TM019904
  Improving Data Quality in IEA Studies: Looking Backward and 
Thinking Forward.
  Medrich, Elliott A.
  Apr 1993
  8p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council 
on Measurement in Education (Atlanta, GA, April 13-15, 1993).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Since studies conducted by the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) have had a dramatic 
impact on the way in which officials in the United States and the 
American public think about the performance of our students, it is 
essential that IEA surveys accurately measure real differences in 
student performance across comparable populations in participating 
countries.  Although data quality in past IEA studies has sometimes 
been problematic, the upcoming Third International Mathematics and 
Science Study (TIMSS) affords the opportunity to develop methods of 
data presentation that achieve reliable cross-national comparisons.  
Two issues in particular merit consideration.  The first issue is 
ensuring that field outcomes in participating countries are 
comparable and representative of a defined target population.  A 
second aspect concerns survey response rates.  It will also be 
necessary to determine how to deal with data when certain standards 
are not achieved.  One chart lists the number of participating 
systems in the various IEA studies.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Analysis; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Data Collection; Elementary Secondary Education; 
Foreign Countries; Futures (of Society); International Studies; 
National Surveys; Quality Control; Response Rates (Questionnaires); 
*Scores; *Test Results
  Identifiers: Educational Information; Evaluation Standards; 
*International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; Target Populations; 
*Third International Mathematics and Science Study


  
  EJ493906  SO525979
  What Does the United States Want to Learn from International 
Comparative Studies in Education?
  Griffith, Jeanne E.; Medrich, Elliott A.
  Prospects, v22 n4 p476-85   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Contends that, although surveys of international achievement have 
been of interest to the U.S. educational community, these studies are 
now receiving attention among policymakers.  Asserts that significant 
changes are occurring in world economy and that international 
achievement comparisons are receiving coverage in the U.S. media.  
(CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; Adult Education; Curriculum 
Development; Educational Objectives; *Educational Research; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; Higher Education; 
International Education; *International Educational Exchange; 
Mathematics Instruction; Research Reports; *Research Utilization; 
Second Language Instruction; Teacher Education; *Theory Practice 
Relationship; Use Studies
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
National Center for Educational Statistics; *Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study


 
  EJ488662  SO525611
  TIMSS Curriculum Analysis: Topic Trace Mapping.
  Schmidt, William H.
  Prospects, v22 n3 p326-33   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Uses three methods to analyze the intended curriculum in countries 
participating in the Third International Mathematics and Science 
Study (TIMSS).  Explains the use of Topic Trace Mapping as a tool to 
examine the issue of depth versus breadth in the curriculum.  
Includes three figures illustrating the results of Topic Trace 
Mapping.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Curriculum Evaluation; *Educational Research; 
Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; International 
Studies; *Mathematics Achievement; Mathematics Instruction; Research 
Methodology; *Science Instruction
  Identifiers: National Science Foundation; *Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study; Topic Trace Mapping


  
  EJ488659  SO525608
  Major Survey Design Issues for the IEA Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study.
  Wiley, David E.; Wolfe, Richard G.
  Prospects, v22 n3 p297-304   1992
  ISSN: 0033-1538
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Policymakers
  Discusses the research design for the Third International 
Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) of the International 
Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA).  
Asserts that the TIMSS is a compromise between longitudinal and cross-
sectional survey designs and will yield more information about 
student achievement.  (CFR)
  Descriptors: *Academic Achievement; *Comparative Education; Cross 
Cultural Studies; *Educational Research; Elementary Secondary 
Education; International Educational Exchange; *Mathematics 
Achievement; Mathematics Instruction; *Research Design; Science 
Instruction
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
Survey Research



  ED359027  SE053152
  Evaluation in Science: Content or Process?
  Kjoernsli, Marit; Jorde, Doris
  Apr 1992
  18p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April, 1992).
  Document Type: REVIEW LITERATURE (070);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Science assessment has been included with mathematics and language 
assessment on the international level since the 1970s.  This paper 
discusses techniques of assessment that have been utilized to measure 
science process skills.  The first section discusses the Assessment 
Performance Unit, a British project with the aim of developing 
innovative methods in assessing science achievement.  Six categories 
of science activities for assessment purposes were identified by the 
project: (1) use of graphical and symbolic representation; (2) use of 
apparatus and measuring instruments; (3) observation; (4) 
interpretation and application; (5) planning of investigations; and 
(6) performance of investigations.  The second section discusses the 
International Science Studies conducted by the International 
Association for Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA).  
Assessment items used for the first and second studies are described.  
The remainder of the paper presents the assessment techniques that 
were piloted for use in the third study.  The following categories of 
questions were used in the Third International Math and Science 
Study: (1) multiple choice items; (2) open-ended written items; (3) 
performance tasks, which produce a physical product beyond writing; 
and (4) performance tasks where the process of actually doing the 
task is documented and examined.  Sample items for each of these 
categories are presented and discussed.  (Contains 16 references.) 
(MDH)
  Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education; *Evaluation Methods; 
Foreign Countries; *International Studies; Knowledge Level; *Multiple 
Choice Tests; Pilot Projects; Science Education; Science Tests; 
Student Evaluation; *Test Construction; Test Validity
  Identifiers: Assessment of Performance Unit (United Kingdom); 
*International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; Open Ended Questions; 
Performance Based Evaluation; Science Achievement; Science Process 
Skills; *Third International Math and Science Study
[Table of Contents]

ERIC Documents Citations for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), international dimensions

  EJ370239  EA522165
  The NAEP and International Comparisons.
  Wolf, Richard M.
  Phi Delta Kappan, v69 n8 p580-82 Apr   1988
  Available From: UMI
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Two assessment agencies, the National Assessment of Educational 
Progress (NAEP) in the U.S. and the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), provide the most 
promising framework for comparing U.S. education with education in 
other nations.  These agencies can cooperate to resolve technical 
issues and make data interpretation and international comparisons 
more meaningful.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Achievement Tests; Comparative Analysis; *Educational 
Cooperation; Elementary Secondary Education; Foreign Countries; 
*International Organizations; Measurement; Professional Associations; 
Scores; *Test Construction; *Test Interpretation
  Identifiers: *International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*National Assessment of Educational Progress

 

  ED279707  TM870094
  NAEP and International Comparisons.
  Wolf, Richard M.
  1986
  20p.; One of 46 papers commissioned by the Study Group on the 
National Assessment of Student Achievement and cited in Appendix B to 
their final report "The Nation's Report Card" (TM 870 049). For other 
papers in this group, see TM 870 050-093.
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120)
  This paper examines a number of issues surrounding the addition of 
a dimension of international comparisons to the National Assessment 
of Educational Progress (NAEP).  The basic position of the paper is 
that adding an international dimension to NAEP is certainly possible, 
but some problems will need to be overcome.  Non-issues are 
identified and eliminated, including: (1) the organization of United 
States participation in the International Association for the 
Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA); and (2) response rates 
in IEA studies.  Issues to be considered fall into three major 
categories: (1) financial and political, (2) technical, and (3) 
interpretation.  Financial and political problems center around 
control and support for IEA projects.  Another political problem 
relates to an IEA policy of not releasing any nation's data to 
another nation until an international report has been released.  
Technical issues include age and grade levels for testing, test 
construction, testing conditions, test organization, time of testing, 
and schedules of studies.  When comparing nations, the results will 
need to be intepreted carefully.  An appendix contains background 
materials about IEA.  (LMO)
  Descriptors: *Comparative Testing; *Cross Cultural Studies; 
*Educational Assessment; Educational Policy; Educational Testing; 
Elementary Secondary Education; *Evaluation Needs; Financial Support; 
*International Cooperation; International Programs; National Surveys; 
Testing Problems; Testing Programs; Test Interpretation
  Identifiers: *International Evaluation Education Achievement; 
*National Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  ED279678  TM870065
  Roles of the National Assessment of Educational Progress in 
International Studies.
  Guthrie, John T.
  23 Jul 1986
  13p.; One of 46 papers commissioned by the Study Group on the 
National Assessment of Student Achievement and cited in Appendix B to 
their final report "The Nation's Report Card" (TM 870 049). For other 
papers in this group, see TM 870 050-094.
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120)
  This paper discusses the rationale for international comparisons in 
educational achievement, presents factors which affect the validity 
of such comparisons, and makes recommendations for the role of the 
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) with respect to 
international studies.  International comparisons are of interest in 
policy formation, resource allocation, and school improvement 
programs.  Four prerequisites to international assessment also weigh 
heavily in an individual, national testing program: (1) the scope of 
item content must be equitable for each of the countries involved; 
(2) comparisons across countries will be facilitated by the use of 
common scaling techniques; (3) sampling must be representative and 
aedquate; and (4) the appropriate language must be used in testing.  
NAEP can facilitate international comparisons by collaborating with 
existing efforts such as those of the International Association for 
the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA).  NAEP can provide 
technical assistance in data collection and statistical analysis.  An 
official liaison between NAEP and IEA is recommended at the policy 
level.  An annual cooperative working meeting is also recommended.  
(GDC)
  Descriptors: Achievement Tests; Agency Cooperation; *Comparative 
Testing; Cross Cultural Studies; *Educational Assessment; Educational 
Testing; Elementary Secondary Education; Evaluation Utilization; 
Foreign Countries; *International Cooperation; Measurement Objectives; 
National Surveys; *Testing Programs; Test Use
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*National Assessment of Educational Progress


  
  ED279672  TM870059
  The Cost of National and State Educational Assessments.
  Cronin, Joseph M.
  Aug 1986
  17p.; One of 46 papers commissioned by the Study Group on the 
National Assessment of Student Achievement and cited in Appendix B to 
their final report "The Nation's Report Card" (TM 870 049). For other 
papers in this group, see TM 870 050-094.
  Document Type: POSITION PAPER (120)
  The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessed 
three grade levels and 21-year-olds in the 1960's, at an annual cost 
of $6 million.  By the early 1980's, adults were no longer tested and 
funds had decreased to $3.8 million.  Other governmental departments, 
however, have also been funded for testing and a number of state 
testing programs have been implemented recently.  New York State's 
comprehensive minimum competency testing program, like the NAEP's, 
cost $3.8 million annually.  Test construction is very costly.  The 
Council of Chief State School Officers recommends testing during 
grades 5, 8, and 11.  NAEP tests grades 3, 7, and 11.  Local school 
district testing programs generally have goals that differ from those 
of the state programs.  Local boards use tests for purposes of 
diagnosis, proficiency testing, or ranking.  In the 1970's the 
international project, IEA (International Association for Evaluation 
of Educational Achievement) became an attention-commanding project; 
however United States government officials are not encouraged to 
fully participate in IEA planning.  Coordination of IEA and NAEP 
procedures could reduce costs.  Some state programs use NAEP items 
for purposes of comparison.  Costs for each state's testing programs 
can range from $105,000 to $525,000, depending on the number of 
subjects tested per year; total national costs could range from 
$5,250,000 to $25,250,000.  (GDC)
  Descriptors: *Educational Assessment; *Educational Finance; 
Educational Testing; Elementary Secondary Education; Federal State 
Relationship; Financial Support; Information Needs; International 
Programs; National Programs; *National Surveys; *Program Costs; 
School Districts; State Programs; *State Surveys; *Testing Programs
  Identifiers: International Assn Evaluation Educ Achievement; 
*National Assessment of Educational Progress
[Table of Contents]

ERIC Documents Citations for the International Adult Literacy Survey


  ED403315  TM026050
  International Adult Literacy.
  ETS Policy Notes, v1 n1 Sum 1996  1996
  14p.; This issue of "ETS Policy Notes" is a condensation of 
"Literacy, Economy and Society: Results of the First International 
Adult Literacy Survey" published by the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development and Statistics, Canada.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  SERIAL (022)
  Systematic knowledge about the dimensions and levels of literacy 
and information about its distribution are prerequisites for forming 
good educational policy.  This issue discusses the conduct and 
findings of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS).  The IALS 
was not intended to rank literacy skills across countries, but was 
intended to make the exploration of differences across countries 
possible.  Participating were: (1) Canada; (2) Germany; (3) the 
Netherlands; (4) Poland; (5) Sweden; (6) French-speaking Switzerland; 
(7) German-speaking Switzerland; and (8) the United States.  In all 
participating countries, employment was positively related to 
literacy, and in all cases there was a clear and direct effect of 
literacy on wages and income.  Industries that have grown in the last 
20 years are those in which the incumbents had the highest literacy 
scores.  In spite of these similarities, the relationship between 
education and literacy was not the same in every country or from 
scale to scale, making direct comparisons impossible.  Differences in 
literacy practices reflected the countries' different occupational 
distributions.  In countries where the average literacy scores were 
highest, the greatest use of literacy-related tasks was reported.  
The information provided by the IALS has made a start in 
demonstrating the strong association between literacy and life 
chances while indicating that literacy is not synonymous with 
educational attainment.  (Contains six figures.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Adult Literacy; Comparative Analysis; *Economic 
Factors; *Educational Policy; Employment Patterns; Foreign Countries; 
Income; International Education; International Studies; Labor Force; 
Outcomes of Education; *Socioeconomic Status
  Identifiers: *International Adult Literacy Survey; *Life Chances



  ED388881  CE070312
  Literacy, Economy and Society. Results of the First International 
Adult Literacy Survey.
  1995
  196p.
  ISBN: 92-64-14655-5
  Available From: OECD Publications and Information Centre, 2001 L 
Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-4910 ($40).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  STATISTICAL MATERIAL (110)
  The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a collaborative 
effort by seven governments and three intergovernmental organizations 
to describe and compare the literacy skills of people from Canada, 
Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United 
States.  Each country drew a probability sample from which results 
representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized population aged 
16-65 could be derived.  Between 1,370 and 3,053 individuals in each 
country completed survey instruments in English, French, German, 
Dutch, Polish, or Swedish.  The findings were reported in four ways 
by three researchers.  Irwin Kirsch (Educational Testing Service, 
Princeton, New Jersey) presented a framework for 
understanding/interpreting literacy levels on three scales (prose, 
document, and quantitative) and discussed the study results in the 
context of literacy's multifaceted nature.  Stan Jones (Carleton 
University, Ottawa, Canada) analyzed the distribution of literacy 
across national populations and among different demographic subgroups 
and explored the relationship between literacy practices (at work and 
in the community) and levels of literacy.  T. Scott Murray 
(Statistics Canada) considered the policy implications of the study 
findings.  Major findings were as follows: (1) important differences 
in literacy skills exist across and within nations; (2) literacy 
skill deficits affect large proportions of the adult population; (3) 
literacy is strongly correlated with life chances and use of 
opportunities; (4) literacy is not synonymous with educational 
attainment; (5) literacy skills are maintained through regular use; 
and (7) adults with low literacy levels do not usually acknowledge or 
recognize they have a problem.  (Seventy-one figures/tables are 
included.  Appended are a list of survey participants and 82 
additional tables detailing the distribution and practice of 
literacy.) (MN)
  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education; *Adult Literacy; Adult Reading 
Programs; Comparative Analysis; Cultural Context; Demography; 
Economic Factors; Educational Needs; Educational Policy; Education 
Work Relationship; Enrollment; Foreign Countries; Functional Literacy; 
Participant Characteristics; *Reading Achievement; Reading Skills; 
Skill Development; Tables (Data); Theory Practice Relationship
  Identifiers: Canada; Germany; *International Adult Literacy Survey; 
International Surveys; Netherlands; Poland; Sweden; Switzerland; 
United States

Instructions for ERIC Documents Access

[Table of Contents]


Degree Articles

School Articles

Lesson Plans

Learning Articles

Education Articles

 

 Full-text Library | Search ERIC | Test Locator | ERIC System | Assessment Resources | Calls for papers | About us | Site map | Search | Help

Sitemap 1 - Sitemap 2 - Sitemap 3 - Sitemap 4 - Sitemap 5 - Sitemap 6

©1999-2012 Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation. All rights reserved. Your privacy is guaranteed at ericae.net.

Under new ownership