Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation

Library | SearchERIC | Test Locator | ERIC System | Resources | Calls for papers | About us

 

 


ERIC Documents Database Citations & Abstracts for Parents' Attitudes About Report Cards


Instructions for ERIC Documents Access

Search Strategy:
Report Cards [as ERIC Descriptor]
AND
Parent Attitudes [as ERIC Descriptor]
  EJ567340  EA534740
  Computerized Report Card Comment Menus: Teacher Use and Teacher 
Parent Perceptions.
  Friedman, Stephen J.; Valde, Gregory A.; Obermeyer, B. J.
  ERS Spectrum, v16 n2 p37-42 Spr   1998
  ISSN: 0740-7874
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  RESEARCH REPORT (143)
  Examines how teachers use computerized comment menus on report 
cards and what teachers and parents think of the process, An analysis 
of report cards for 475 Wisconsin middle-school students shows 
teachers used comments most of the time.  Only 52% of students 
received two comments.  Most comments were positive.  Parents and 
teachers found the practice helpful, but preferred personalized 
comments, when time permitted.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: *Computer Uses in Education; Intermediate Grades; 
Middle Schools; *Parent Attitudes; *Report Cards; Research Needs; 
Small Towns; *Teacher Attitudes
  Identifiers: Wisconsin

  
  EJ565125  EA534690
  What Parents Want from Teachers.
  Rich, Dorothy
  Educational Leadership, v55 n8 p37-39 May   1998
  ISSN: 0013-1784
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Parents in Anchorage, Alaska, and Rochester, New York, have been 
rating their children's teachers.  From these report cards arise 
three major concerns: how well teachers know and care about teaching, 
about their children, and about communicating with parents.  
Educators can capitalize on parent reports, on getting credit for 
what they do well, and on ensuring that teachers and parents 
cooperate to improve student learning.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education; *Parent Attitudes; 
*Parent School Relationship; *Parent Teacher Cooperation; *Report 
Cards; *Teacher Response
  Identifiers: Anchorage School District AK; Rochester City School 
District NY

  
  EJ555453  EA534121
  Report Card Reform.
  Pardini, Priscilla
  School Administrator, v54 n11 p19-20,22-25 Dec   1997
  ISSN: 0036-6439
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Administrators are struggling to make the report cards sent home to 
parents more meaningful.  Alternative ways to report student progress 
find more favor among educators than parents, as anecdotal evidence 
from several communities shows.  Revamping attempts fail due to 
substantive problems with new reporting procedures or inept public-
relations efforts.  A sidebar provides reform advice.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: Administrator Responsibility; Community Attitudes; 
Community Support; Elementary Secondary Education; *Parent Attitudes; 
*Public Relations; *Report Cards; *Resistance to Change; *Student Evaluation
  Identifiers: *Alternative Assessment; *Reform Efforts


  EJ494721  EA530237
  Reforming Report Cards.
  Allison, Eileen; Friedman, Stephen J.
  Executive Educator, v17 n1 p38-39 Jan   1995
  ISSN: 0161-9500  
  Document Type: PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  When parents objected to a new performance-based achievement scale, 
a Wisconsin school revised its report card to reflect traditional 
letter grades for each main subject area, using the new scale to 
measure component skill areas.  Schools can weather controversy by 
making report cards reflect school philosophy, involving school 
personnel and parents, doing necessary research, clarifying purpose, 
and realizing the power of tradition.  (MLH)
  Descriptors: Elementary Education; Grade 4; Grade 5; *Grading; 
*Guidelines; *Parent Attitudes; Portfolios (Background Materials); 
*Report Cards; *Student Evaluation
  Identifiers: *Performance Based Evaluation; *Wisconsin (Pewaukee)

  
  ED389734  TM024361
  An Analysis of Parent Opinions and Changes in Opinions Regarding 
Standardized Tests, Teacher's Information, and Performance Assessments.
  Shepard, Lorrie A.; Bleim, Caribeth L.
  National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student 
Testing, Los Angeles, CA.  Feb 1995
  63p.; Portions of the report presented at the Annual Meeting of the 
American Educational Research Association (1993).
  Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement 
(ED), Washington, DC.
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  TEST, QUESTIONNAIRE (160)
  Parent opinions about standardized tests and performance 
assessments were examined systematically.  Mutually exclusive but 
randomly equivalent stratified samples from schools participating in 
a study of performance assessment and control schools were used to 
measure change in parent opinion over time.  Approximately one-third 
of parents (n=105) completed questionnaires at the beginning of the 
school year, one-third completed them at the end of the year (similar 
sample), and the remaining third supplied interview samples (n=33 and 
n=27, respectively).  Results demonstrated that parents' favorable 
ratings of standardized national tests did not imply a preference for 
this type of educational assessment over other types of assessment 
for measuring student or school progress.  Parents considered report 
cards, hearing from the teacher, and seeing graded samples of student 
work as more informative than standardized tests, and they wanted 
comparative information to measure their own child's progress.  When 
parents had a chance to look at performance assessments through the 
year, they endorsed their use for district purposes and preferred 
them for classroom use.  Survey data like the Gallup Poll showing 
widespread approval of standardized tests should not be taken to mean 
that parents are opposed to other forms of assessment.  Appendixes 
contain the parent questionnaire and the interview protocol.  
(Contains 3 figures, 17 tables, and 9 references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: Beliefs; *Educational Assessment; Elementary Secondary 
Education; *Parent Attitudes; *Parents; Parent Teacher Conferences; 
Parent Teacher Cooperation; Questionnaires; Report Cards; 
*Standardized Tests; *Test Use
  Identifiers: *Alternative Assessment; Performance Based Evaluation

  
  EJ490292  TM518129
  Parents' Understanding of Their Children's Report Card Grades.
  Waltman, Kristie K.; Frisbie, David A.
  Applied Measurement in Education, v7 n3 p223-40   1994
  ISSN: 0895-7347
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Whether parents of fourth graders (n=285) interpreted mathematics 
grades with the same meaning as teachers (n=16) who assigned them was 
studied through questionnaires.  Results indicate poor home-to-school 
communication, with a great deal of inconsistency between teachers' 
and parents' views.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Communication (Thought Transfer); *Comprehension; 
Elementary Education; *Elementary School Students; Grade 4; *Grades 
(Scholastic); Grading; Knowledge Level; Mathematics; Parent Attitudes; 
*Parents; Parent School Relationship; Questionnaires; *Report Cards

  
  EJ484897  EA529454
  Parents' View of Traditional and Alternative Report Cards.
  Ohlhausen, Marilyn M.; And Others
  School Community Journal, v4 n1 p81-97 Spr-Sum   1994
  ISSN: 1059-308X
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Explores parents' perspectives of elementary school assessment in 
Clark County (Nevada) School District, using data gathered from 
indepth telephone interviews.  Generally, parents were highly 
satisfied with the current system for reporting student progress, 
although many were concerned about subjectivity and meaning of letter 
grades.  A majority (57%) claimed unfamiliarity with alternative 
assessment methods.  (Contains 43 references.) (MLH)
  Descriptors: Elementary Education; *Grading; *Parent Attitudes; 
Portfolios (Background Materials); *Report Cards; Satisfaction; 
*Student Evaluation
  Identifiers: *Alternative Assessment; *Clark County School District 
NV


  ED361394  TM020496
  Assessment Practices in the Elementary Classroom: Perspectives of 
Stakeholders.
  Anderson, John O.; Bachor, Dan G.
  Apr 1993
  23p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council 
on Measurement in Education (Atlanta, GA, April 13-15, 1993).
  Document Type: RESEARCH REPORT (143);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  Assessment practices used in elementary school classrooms in 
British Columbia (Canada) were explored through a survey that also 
considered the perspectives of the people directly affected by 
assessment: students, parents, teachers, and administrators.  Data 
were collected through focus group interviews with each of the 4 
respondent groups from 10 school districts.  Each group consisted of 
three to eight participants.  The study clarifies characteristics of 
classroom assessment and shows that a number of issues should be 
addressed.  Observation and the review of work samples are the main 
kinds of information collection procedures used in the schools 
studied, and narrative reports are the main form of formal 
communication with parents.  The purpose of assessment is locating 
the student within the instructional program, to devise and implement 
appropriate learning strategies for the child, to inform the child 
and parents of progress, and also to fulfill the reporting 
requirements of the school and district.  While teachers often saw 
shortcomings in the grading process, parents and students were more 
likely to see grades as more accurate than other forms of reporting.  
Aspects of assessment practice that could be improved include a need 
for more explicit description of the learning and development 
pathways and a more concrete explanation of the evaluation process.  
An appendix contains the focus group questions.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Achievement Rating; *Administrator Attitudes; 
*Classroom Techniques; *Educational Assessment; Elementary Education; 
Elementary School Students; Elementary School Teachers; Foreign 
Countries; Grades (Scholastic); *Parent Attitudes; Report Cards; 
School Surveys; *Student Attitudes; Student Evaluation; *Teacher 
Attitudes; Test Use
  Identifiers: *British Columbia; Focus Groups Approach; Stakeholders

  
  ED318547  PS018718
  Evaluation of the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option (K-
6) Pupil Progress Report. Volume II: Main Report.
  Guynn, Stephen J.
  Indianapolis Public Schools, Ind.  May 1989
  30p.; For other volumes in this report, see PS 018 717-719.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public 
Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth 
graders were surveyed.  Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1)
the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 
1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and 
weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed.  The 
survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent 
characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and three open-ended 
questions.  The five sections of the survey covered the evaluation
key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to 
parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method.  
The survey elicited parent opinions about the program.  The 
households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 
Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires.  This 
main report describes survey methodology, reports results and 
conclusions, and offers recommendations.  Related materials are 
appended.  (RH)
  Descriptors: *Educational Principles; Elementary Education; 
*Montessori Method; Nontraditional Education; *Parent Attitudes; 
Program Evaluation; *Program Improvement; *Public Schools; *Report 
Cards; Tables (Data)
  Identifiers: *Indianapolis Public Schools IN
  
  
  ED318546  PS018717
  Evaluation of the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option (K-
6) Pupil Progress Report. Volume I: Executive Summary.
  Guynn, Stephen J.
  Indianapolis Public Schools, Ind.  May 1989
  20p.; For other volumes in this report, see PS 018 718-719.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public 
Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth 
graders were surveyed.  Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) 
the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 
1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and 
weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed.  
Questionnaires were sent to the households of 536 pupils and to 50 
school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools.  
Parents and guardians replied positively to 25 closed-ended 
questions; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to four.  
School staff replied positively to 27; were neutral about none; and 
responded negatively to two.  Parents and guardians expressed concern 
about more than 46 survey-related topics.  Parent-initiated topics 
included: competitiveness and comparison between students, curriculum 
design and development, learning environments, parent-teacher 
conferences, program expansion, public school use of Montessori 
philosophy, and staff certification and training.  School staff 
expressed concern about classroom mangagement, instructional 
materials, parent involvement, parent-teacher conferences, skills and 
knowledge analysis, student progress, and the district-wide testing 
program.  Questions and responses (along a Likert-type scale) are 
provided for parents and school staff members.  (RH)
  Descriptors: Elementary Education; *Montessori Method; 
Nontraditional Education; *Parent Attitudes; Program Evaluation; 
*Program Implementation; *Public Schools; *Report Cards; Tables (Data)
  Identifiers: *Indianapolis Public Schools IN
  
  
   ED318548  PS018719
  Evaluation of the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option (K-
6) Pupil Progress Report. Volume III: Appendix.
  Guynn, Stephen J.
  Indianapolis Public Schools, Ind.  May 1989
  57p.; For other volumes in this report, see PS 018 717-718. 
Portions of document contain light and broken type.
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public 
Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth 
graders were surveyed.  Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1)
the pupil progress report>, which was used on a pilot basis during the 
1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and 
weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed.  The 
survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent 
characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and 3 open-ended 
questions.  The five sections of the survey introduced the topics of 
the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card 
delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the 
Montessori method.  The survey elicited parent opinions about the 
program.  The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in 
the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires.  
This appendix to the main report provides: (1) survey design input 
from parents, teachers, and others; (2) the Montessori Option Pupil 
Progress Report Survey; and (3) parent and teacher responses for each 
item.  (RH)
  Descriptors: Elementary Education; *Montessori Method; 
Nontraditional Education; *Parent Attitudes; Program Evaluation; 
*Program Improvement; *Public Schools; Questionnaires; *Report Cards; 
Research Design; Tables (Data)
  Identifiers: *Indianapolis Public Schools IN 

Return to FAQ on Report Cards in Elementary Secondary Education

Return to the Index of FAQs


Degree Articles

School Articles

Lesson Plans

Learning Articles

Education Articles

 

 Full-text Library | Search ERIC | Test Locator | ERIC System | Assessment Resources | Calls for papers | About us | Site map | Search | Help

Sitemap 1 - Sitemap 2 - Sitemap 3 - Sitemap 4 - Sitemap 5 - Sitemap 6

©1999-2012 Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation. All rights reserved. Your privacy is guaranteed at ericae.net.

Under new ownership