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ERIC Documents Database Citations & Abstracts for Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests


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Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests [ERIC Identifier]
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Joint Committee on Testing Practices [ERIC Identifier]
  EJ550066  TM520351
  The Consequences of Consequential Validity.
  Mehrens, William A.
  Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, v16 n2 p16-18 Sum 
  1997
  ISSN: 0731-1745
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  POSITION PAPER (120)
  There is no agreement at present about the importance or meaning of 
the term "consequential validity." It is important that the authors 
of revisions to the "Standards for Educational and Psychological 
Testing" recognize the debate and relegate discussion of consequences 
to a context separate from the discussion of validity.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: Educational Assessment; *Educational Testing; 
Elementary Secondary Education; *Test Use; Test Validity
  Identifiers: *Consequential Evaluation; Standards for Educational 
and Psychological Tests

  
  ED399292  TM025605
  How the "Principles and Indicators for Student Assessment Systems" 
Should Affect Practice.
  Neill, Monty
  National Center for Fair and Open Testing (FairTest), Cambridge, 
MA.  Apr 1996
  15p.; Version of a paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the 
American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, April 8-12, 
1996).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  The "Principles and Indicators for Student Assessment Systems" of 
the National Forum on Assessment, 1995, proposes a view of testing 
and assessment in elementary and secondary education that challenges 
the basic concepts and practices underlying the "Standards for 
Educational and Psychological Testing" of the American Educational 
Research Association and associated organizations.  The "Standards," 
as they exist, are inadequate to the task of stopping the harmful 
social consequences of traditional standardized testing, but the 
"Principles" are constructed to place learning at the center of 
assessment.  The basic model of educational testing addressed by the 
"Standards" relies on norm-referencing and on using multiple-choice 
or short-answer methods.  Rather than enhancing access to education 
in the United States, the dominant forms of testing have limited 
access.  In addition, they rely on outmoded psychological science.  
The seven "Principles" represent an agreement that traditional 
testing practices must change in the direction of becoming helpful 
for student learning.  They replace the norm-referenced, multiple-
choice short answer test with a complex of classroom-based 
assessments revolving around observation, documentation, and 
evaluation.  They also assert that decisions about students must not 
be made on the basis of any single assessment.  If the "Principles" 
were adopted in practice, the "Standards" would have to encourage 
more restrained use of tests and emphasize that assessment become 
compatible with what is known about human learning and development.  
(Contains 61 references.) (SLD)
  Descriptors: Access to Education; *Educational Testing; Elementary 
Secondary Education; *Equal Education; Norm Referenced Tests; 
Objective Tests; *Performance Based Assessment; Psychological Testing; 
Psychometrics; *Standardized Tests; Standards; Test Bias; *Test Use
  Identifiers: *Principles and Indicators for Student Assessment; 
*Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests

  
  EJ498497  UD518410
  Performance Assessment: Policy Promises and Technical Measurement 
Standards.
  Linn, Robert L.
  Educational Researcher, v23 n9 p4-14 Dec   1994
  ISSN: 0013-189X
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  JOURNAL ARTICLE (080)
  Major changes underway with regard to educational assessment 
include an increased role for the federal government; increased 
emphasis on standards; and increased reliance on performance 
assessment.  These changes are the context for the effort to revise 
the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Educational Assessment; Educational Change; 
Educational Policy; Educational Testing; Elementary Secondary 
Education; Federal Government; *Government Role; *Measurement 
Techniques; Psychological Testing; *Public Policy; *Standards
  Identifiers: *Performance Based Evaluation; *Reform Efforts; 
Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests

  
  ED379332  TM022710
  Suggestions from Representatives of the International Language 
Testing Association for Revision of the "AERA/APA/NCME Standards for 
Educational and Psychological Testing."
  Stansfield, Charles W.; Spolsky, Bernard
  Oct 1994
  8p.; Testimony delivered before the Joint Committee on Standards 
for Educational and Psychological Testing of the American Educational 
Research Association (AERA), the American Psychological Association 
(APA), and the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME), 
at the Open Conference on Revision of the "Standards" (Crystal City, 
VA, October 5-7, 1994).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  The International Language Testing Association has some 250 members 
in 15 countries.  Most are specialists in the testing of second 
language skills, with a special interest in performance assessment 
because of the testing of speaking and writing performance that is 
critical to second language skills assessment.  The association 
believes that certain areas deserve additional attention in the next 
version of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." 
First of these is the area of standard setting.  The current version 
of the "Standards" gives little guidance about standard-setting 
approaches.  The experience of association members also suggests that 
reactions of pretest examinees can play a major role in revising and 
improving performance tasks.  Other areas that merit further study 
are reliability, statistics for test analysis, and the role of 
language in tests.  The new version of the "Standards" should address 
the issue of the critical role language will play in performance 
based tests of subject matter that rely heavily on language.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Educational Testing; Feedback; Language Skills; 
*Language Tests; *Language Usage; *Psychological Testing; Second 
Language Instruction; Statistical Analysis; *Test Construction; Test 
Reliability
  Identifiers: International Language Testing Association; 
*Performance Based Evaluation; Standard Setting; *Standards for 
Educational and Psychological Tests

  
  EJ419360  TM515470
  The Profession's Evolving Standards.
  Faggen, Jane
  Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, v9 n4 p3-4 Win 
  1990
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  POSITION PAPER (120)
  The gap between professionally and legally acceptable practice in 
professional licensure tests is addressed.  Pertinent activities of 
the American Psychological Association, American Educational Research 
Association, and the National Council for Measurement in Education 
are discussed.  (TJH)
  Descriptors: Civil Rights Legislation; Educational Testing; *Legal 
Problems; *Licensing Examinations (Professions); *Occupational Tests; 
*Professional Associations; Psychological Testing; *Standards; 
*Testing Problems; Test Validity
  Identifiers: *Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests; 
Testing Legislation

  
  EJ394544  UD514424
  Developing a Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education.
  Fremer, John; And Others
  American Psychologist, v44 n7 p1062-67 Jul   1989
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  PROJECT DESCRIPTION (141)
  Target Audience: Practitioners
  The Joint Committee on Testing Practices (JCTP) is a coordinating 
body sponsored by professional organizations and test publishers that 
seeks to advance the quality of testing practices and insure the 
rights of test takers.  The JCTP has issued a code, reprinted here, 
advocating fairness in test construction, selection, and 
interpretation.  (AF)
  Descriptors: *Codes of Ethics; Culture Fair Tests; Educational 
Practices; Educational Quality; *Educational Testing; Psychological 
Testing; Public Policy; Test Bias; *Test Construction; *Testing 
Problems; *Test Interpretation; *Test Use
  Identifiers: American Educational Research Association; American 
Psychological Association; *Fairness; National Council on Measurement 
in Education; Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests; Test 
Publishers


    EJ394512  TM514512
  The Joint Committee on Testing Practices and the Code of Fair 
Testing Practices in Education.
  Diamond, Esther E.; Fremer, John
  Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, v8 n1 p23-24 Spr 
  1989
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  The Joint Committee on Testing Practices has completed the "Code of 
Fair Testing Practices in Education," which is meant for the public 
and focuses on the proper use of tests in education--admissions, 
educational assessment and diagnosis, and student placement.  The
Code separately addresses test developers' and users' roles. (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Educational Testing; Evaluation Utilization; 
Examiners; Scoring; *Standards; Test Construction; Testing Problems; 
*Test Use
  Identifiers: *Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education; *Joint 
Committee on Testing Practices; Test Developers; Test Publishers

  
  ED304465  TM012839
  APA's Role in Fostering Good Testing Practices.
  Camara, Wayne J.
  Aug 1988
  7p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Psychological Association (96th, Atlanta, GA, August 12-16, 1988).
  Document Type: CONFERENCE PAPER (150);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Psychological testing has played a major role in the American 
Psychological Association (APA) because testing and assessment are 
important aspects of what psychologists do; tests assist 
psychologists in diagnosis and treatment.  From its earliest years, 
APA has had one or more committees concerned with testing.  The 
present Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessment (CPTA) has 
played an important part in developing standards for various kinds of 
psychological tests.  The nine-member CPTA is the only committee 
reporting to more than one parent board at the APA.  APA recognizes 
the importance of testing to the public and has been instrumental in 
the development of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological 
Tests." APA sponsored the meeting from which the Joint Committee on 
Testing Practices (JCTP) grew.  The JCTP is a means by which test 
publishers and professional organizations can work together to 
improve the use of tests in assessment and appraisal.  While APA will 
continue to provide staff support, JCTP will better represent all 
testing professionals by not being dependent on any one group.  The 
JCTP can take on projects to benefit all parties in testing, while 
remaining free of the controversial policy and psychometric issues 
APA must consider.  (SLD)
  Descriptors: *Agency Role; Educational Policy; *Psychological 
Testing; Psychometrics; *Standards; Test Construction; *Testing; Test 
Use
  Identifiers: *American Psychological Association; *Joint Committee 
on Testing Practices


  ED301574  TM012406
  Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education.
  Joint Committee on Testing Practices, Washington, DC.
  1988
  5p.
  Available From: National Council on Measurement in Education, 1230 
Seventeenth St., NW, Washington, DC 20036 (single copies free).
  Document Type: CLASSROOM MATERIAL (050);  LEGAL MATERIAL (090)
  Target Audience: Researchers; Practitioners
Guidelines for test developers and users are provided to insure
that construction and selection of test instruments are conducted 
fairly.  In addition to development and selection, issues of 
interpretation of scores; provision of information to test takers; 
and prevention of test bias based on race, gender, or ethnicity are 
addressed.  Twenty-one guidelines are provided to test developers and 
users, 16 of which are divided into pairs of parallel directives for developers
and users. The guidelines are intended to be consistent 
with the relevant parts of the "Standards for Educational and 
Psychological Testing" (1985).  However, the guidelines differ from 
the standards in both audience and purpose.  The guidelines are meant 
to be understood by the general public, limited to educational tests, 
and focused primarily on those issues that affect the proper use of 
tests.  (TJH)
  Descriptors: *Codes of Ethics; *Educational Testing; Test Bias; 
Test Construction; *Testing; Test Interpretation; Test Selection; 
Test Use
  Identifiers: *Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests

  
  EJ365772  CG533498
  A Review of the 1985 Standards for Educational and Psychological 
Testing: User Responsibility and Social Justice.
  Wagner, Edwin E.
  Journal of Counseling and Development, v66 n4 p202-03 Dec 
  1987
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  REVIEW LITERATURE (070)
  Reviews the new "Standards for Educational and Psychological 
Testing" (1985) (Standards), the latest in a series of five 
publications intended to inform professionals who use tests of the 
best available technical and ethical recommendations regarding 
testing practices and procedures.  Describes the Standards, compares 
it with the 1984 edition, and outlines implications for counselors.  
(Author/KS)
  Descriptors: Book Reviews; *Counseling; *Educational Testing; 
Ethics; *Psychological Testing; *Standards; Testing
  Identifiers: *Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests

  
  EJ340077  EC190312
  Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing: More than a 
Symbolic Exercise.
  Yoshida, Roland K.; Friedman, Douglas L.
  Special Services in the Schools, v2 n2-3 p187-93 Win-Spr 198
  1986
  Journal Availability: see, EC 190 301. Theme Issue: Emerging 
Perspectives on Assessment of Exceptional Children.
  Document Type: JOURNAL ARTICLE (080);  REVIEW LITERATURE (070)
  The 1985 edition of the American Psychological Association's 
"Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" has greatly 
expanded its coverage of the testing of handicapped students.  Recent 
surveys of practitioners' knowledge of basic testing and measurement 
concepts suggest the need for extensive in-service training if these 
standards are to be implemented.  (Author/DB)
  Descriptors: *Disabilities; *Educational Testing; Elementary 
Secondary Education; *Psychological Testing; *Standards; *Testing 
Problems
  Identifiers: *Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests


    ED284911  TM870496
  Evaluating Criterion-referenced Tests. ERIC Digest.
  Hambleton, Ronald K.
  ERIC Clearinghouse on Tests, Measurement, and Evaluation, 
Princeton, N.J.  1986
  4p.
  Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement 
(ED), Washington, DC.
  Document Type: ERIC PRODUCT (071);  EVALUATIVE REPORT (142)
  Target Audience: Practitioners
  Criterion-referenced tests (CRTs) are constructed to permit the 
interpretation of examinee tests performance in relation to a set of 
well-defined competencies.  CRTs are currently used extensively in 
schools, industry, and the armed services because they provide 
valuable and different information from norm-referenced tests.  Test 
publishers, school districts, and state departments of education 
produce CRTs; however, many of the available tests fall far short of 
the technical quality necessary for them to accomplish their intended 
purposes.  This digest provides practitioners and test developers 
with guidelines for evaluating CRTs.  Drawn from the Standards for 
Educational and Psychological Testing, 25 content and technical 
questions are presented that must be answered when evaluating 
criterion-referenced tests.  The technology for preparing CRTs is now 
well developed, and practitioners can avoid improperly prepared tests 
by addressing these questions.  (BS)
  Descriptors: Behavioral Objectives; *Criterion Referenced Tests; 
Decision Making; *Evaluation Criteria; *Specifications; *Test 
Construction; Test Interpretation
  Identifiers: *ERIC Digests; Standards for Educational and 
Psychological Tests; Test Specifications

  
  ED278705  TM870132
  Pupil Norms or Norms for Building Averages: Which Are Most 
Appropriate for Reporting Building Data and Other Summary Data?
  Drahozal, Edward C.
  Feb 1986
  15p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southwest 
Educational Research Association (Houston, TX, January 30-February 1, 
1986).
  Document Type: EVALUATIVE REPORT (142);  CONFERENCE PAPER (150)
  This paper argues that the standard "When it is expected that a 
test will be used to make norm-referenced assessments of groups 
rather than individuals, normative data based on appropriate group 
statistics should be provided," which was considered secondary in the 
1985 "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" and 
essential in the 1974 standards, should be considered conditional; 
that is, primary for some situations and secondary for others.  When 
tests are to report building averages, it is better to use school or 
group norms rather than pupil norms.  To support this assumption, two 
sets of data from standardized tests are compared: (1) data for pupil 
norms and school average norms for grades 2, 6, and 8 obtained from 
published norms tables for the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, 1978; and 
(2) data for pupil norms and "small group" and "large group" norms 
obtained from the norms tables for the Stanford Achievement Tests, 
1982.  The results show that median pupil scores and the median 
school average scores are seldom the same.  Illustrations show that 
distribution of school averages is considerably less variable than 
the distribution of pupil scores.  A copy of the class average 
performance and its relationship to school average performance for a 
university economics course is attached.  (JAZ)
  Descriptors: *Achievement Tests; Elementary Education; Elementary 
Secondary Education; Grade Point Average; Grades (Scholastic); Higher 
Education; Norm Referenced Tests; School Districts; Standards; 
Statistical Distributions; Testing Problems; *Test Interpretation; 
*Test Norms; *Test Use
  Identifiers: Iowa Tests of Basic Skills; *Percentile Ranks; 
Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests; Stanford 
Achievement Tests

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